THE WEBSTER OPENS ITS NEWEST LOCATION IN NYC

With the store originating from the tropics of South Beach and having expanded to Houston, Costa Mesa, and Bal Harbour—it was only natural for The Webster to house their new location in the heart of New York City’s, Soho. Laure Heriard Dubreuil, founder of the luxury retailer, has mirrored the same opulent brand formula with a new ingredient—Webster Home. The six story building will handle pieces by Italian artist Gaetano Pesce, Pierre Frey fabrics that are exclusive to The Webster, and Nada Debs brass candy colored pebble table. Throughout the renovation of their new location The Webster befriended Maxi Cohen, photographer, video artist, and neighbor whose piece is now featured on the third floor.

The store is thoughtfully filled with French 50’s sconce lights and wall papers from the 20’s and 30’s and does the historical 1878, 12,000-square-foot building proud. Turn of the century light wells guide you onto a vintage loading dock entrance, and step out into a room that’s a fusion of new and retrograded pieces mirroring the original Webster store, which was redeveloped with the help and design of Christopher Osvai.

Filling the six floored location are thirty male designers and 68 women designers, including but not limited to Isa Arfen, Julien David, and jewelry by Anita Ko, The Webster combines high end clothing interwoven amongst art deco and one of a kind installations. Sculptures such as Aaron Young’s “Below the Underdog, 2010” is set amongst thoughtfully chosen menswear on the fourth floor.

For more information about the founder, Laure Heriard Dubreuil, check out her Iris Woman feature!

All photos by Andrew Rowat courtesy of Karla Otto Public Relations

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster, located at 29 Greene Street, opened to the public Monday, November 6, 2017

Shop online here

THE LADY IS A VAMP

Although not one of the typical fashion hubs like New York, Milan, or Paris, Eastern European designers have been vying for attention and pushing the limit in fashion over the past decade. From Vetements to Gosha Rubchinskiy, Eastern Europe has become the leader in fashion and leaving us all wanting a piece of the former Eastern Bloc. We have cast a spotlight on the creatives of one country, Ukraine, and the designers who have managed to enter the global stage.

Photography by Mikhail Vovk @mikhailvovk | Styling  by Nika Kovtsur @nikakovtsur | Beauty by Liudmila Agakhanova @agakhanova_liu | Model Anna Rudenko @rudenkoannaua (MAG @modelagentgroup)

Vest by Alonova

 

Leather coat, pants and shoes by Alonova, Earrings by J.W. Anderson

Total look by Ostel

Blouse by Dafna May, Belt by Alonova, Trousers by Ostel, Earrings Stylist’s own

Trousers by Ostel, Jacket and Shoes by Dafna May

Suit by Nadia Yurkiv, Brooch Stylist’s own

Total look by Alonova

Suit by Nadia Yurkiv, Earrings Stylist’s own

Total look by Alonova

_

Style Assistant – Jacob Kotlik @jacobkotlik

HALEY BENNETT

Though press has angled her as a “girl on the rise” for years, Haley Bennett has proven herself as the screen siren she set out to become.

Photography by Diego Uchitel @Jones Management Styling by Sean Knight Interview by Dustin Mansyur
Top, Skirt and Belt by Michael Kors

It takes a special kind of girl from the Midwest to brave the shark-infested waters of Hollywood and emerge, not only unscathed, but also with one’s truest character still intact. In a world quick to tell you everything that you are not, Haley Bennett unapologetically beats her own drum to a tune that she is: grounded, earnest, and refreshingly honest. Her ability to play upon her vulnerabilities both on and off screen is what makes her most enticing. Having an “affinity for characters who have experienced loss” isn’t necessarily the kind of target P.R. strategy that most would choose for the path to becoming A-list. But then Bennett isn’t most.

For Haley’s convincing, intricate range of emotion as an actor, these are just the kind of roles that have given her career dimension and life. The whole of her experience has left her in touch with her humanity and its many complexities, in a way that makes her empathetic and aspirational. She is a different breed of protagonist, a new form of hero that captivates with a quiet strength – one that relies on the tools of good acting instead of flashy special effects. With exciting projects on the horizon, including the highlyanticipated directorial debut of Jason Hall’s Thank You For Your Service based on the Pulitzer-prize winning book by David Finkel, Bennett is positioned to beguile audiences yet again in what is certain to be a compelling story of love and war.

IRIS Covet Book recently had a chance to catch up with the winsome actress while on the set of her latest movie in production, Red Sea Diving Project. Bennett is perched inside of a production trailer on set, pandemonium ensues as the worker bees of wardrobe fawn over her, determining which pair of sunglasses best compliment her alabaster skin.


Dress by Jil Sander

How are you doing Haley? They told me you were going to be on set today for our interview.

I’m well thank you! I’m just in a hair and wardrobe test – we are dealing with wigs, sunglasses and all sorts of fun stuff!

I just want to start with a little bit about your background before we move into talking about your upcoming projects. Where did you grow up and what was your adolescence like?

I grew up near Akron, Ohio. Actually, my grandparents lived in a little town called Brimfield. It was delightfully Midwest, and quite outdoorsy as I still am. My dad was actually just visiting here in Africa, and we hiked to this incredible location called the Elephant’s Eye. It wasn’t far from what my life was like growing up. My dad would take me deer hunting, fishing, and four wheeling. I was climbing trees and swimming in creeks. It was all very idyllic.

Overalls by Palace Costume

It sounds picturesque. Growing up in the Midwest, what sparked your interest in acting? Was it something that you were drawn to early on?

I have a love for cinema. I grew up watching a lot of Time Warner classics – I was very fortunate to be able to view these incredible classics with my grandparents. I thought it was the closest thing to magic-making. I would think, ‘God, are they real people? Are these real people on real adventures?’ and when I learned that they weren’t real people I became fascinated with the process of filmmaking. Growing up in a small town, I didn’t know or understand what the path would be like in order to do that. But, of course, I wanted to be a part of that world of creating characters and storytelling – sorry, Dustin.

(We are interrupted as a wardrobe designer comes in with a mound of accessories for Haley to try on for screen tests amidst our interview. )

This is crazy! I feel like I’ve become a master juggler. This could be another hour so…

Don’t worry, we can make it work. Last year you had a banner year with a lot of lead roles. You were in The Magnificent Seven, Rules Don’t Apply and The Girl on the Train. I expect it’s only going to get crazier for you as the spotlight shines on you more with your upcoming projects.

This past year I have gotten a lot more exposure, but it has very little to do with me and everything to do with people’s perception I suppose. As an actor, you just continue to do the same work. You always hope that the story that you tell resonates and that the character you are portraying will strike a chord with the audiences. It is a lot of work, but you leave the work on the show and go home when the production is finished and you don’t think about it anymore. Naturally, the more projects you take on, the more constant your schedule is. One of the first things trying to be a master juggler is to do the best you can. It’s just like anything else.

Dress by Rag & Bone

I guess that’s your latest role right now, “master juggler”?

(Laughs) I guess that would be a natural progression. It’s been incredible to get more exposure because you do get more opportunities to come in, and to do films that you believe in. So even though I’m juggling my schedule, the opportunity to be a part of projects I am inspired by is very much welcome. That means that there is more freedom to do things that I set out to do.

Can you share with us a little about your character in the upcoming movie Thank You for Your Service? What is she like?

My character is Saskia, and the film is based on a true story about a battalion coming home from the Iraq War. David Finkel [who wrote The Good Soldier] wrote the [Pulitzer prize-winning] book upon which the film is based. He shadowed veterans who were returning home from Iraq and learned what it really meant for these soldiers to come home and to re-integrate themselves back into their civilian lives. He got to witness and be a part of their journey upon returning home. The film is a story of heartbreak, brotherhood, love and courage. These veterans like Adam Schumann and their families opened themselves up to David. Their stories became very important to us, and we all became very close as cast and crew while filming.

My dad and my grandfather are also veterans, so it was quite a personal journey working on this project. The film explores, not only what the soldiers experienced while in combat in Iraq, but also what their families were going through at home while they were away. When they came home, if they did come home, they were changed people and maybe in some cases unrecognizable to their loved ones. The film gives an intimate view of Saskia’s reality while her husband, Adam, was away – raising their two small children, one of which was under a year old when he returned; and then his journey discovering and coping with PTSD [Post Traumatic Stress Disorder].

Did you actually get to dialog and have conversations with the person whom your character is based upon so that you could better express and play her in the movie?

There was an enormous wealth of information in the book itself, which is very hard to read at times. It showed what Saskia went through. It’s a very complex story, but fortunately I had an opportunity to speak with Saskia prior to the film. Saskia and Adam inevitably separated and went on different paths. Since these are the lives of real people whom we are portraying, we wanted to be respectful and sensitive of their feelings. I wasn’t as close to Saskia as I would have liked, but the material and script that was adapted from the book was so rich.

Dress and Belt by Monse


Do you feel like you personally evolve by learning from the character while working on the project like this? Does it gives you a new perspective on things?

I believe we are constantly learning and evolving. Experiences merge with a person. Even if someone else has had a completely different experience than you have personally, they are still human. As humans, we all share the same spectrum of emotions. It’s innate to our humanity. I always say that I have an affinity for characters that have experienced loss. This film is no different because, in a way, Saskia has experienced an enormous loss. She loses her husband to PTSD and the aftermath of the war, and yet, the interesting part is that a lot of her friends lost their husbands to the war.

She is dealing with a complex and confusing aftermath from the war, and she has an enormous well of feelings of loss, grief, and loneliness that resulted from her husband’s return and diagnosis with PTSD. He isn’t the same man with whom she fell in love and had a full life with prior to the war. So I found her to be an incredibly strong woman to endure this lifestyle and her loss while still managing to be the light within the story.

Cape by Chloe

Wow, that sounds like it was a very emotional project to work on. What is the experience like exiting a production like this after having been in such an emotional role?

It can be an extremely intimate and intense experience depending on the film. This film in particular we had forged these incredible bonds that really allowed us access to each other’s emotions and feelings. So it was quite painful to say goodbye to this cast, crew, and staff. It’s also hard to say goodbye to the character that has made an impact on you the way that Saskia did for me. We really exposed ourselves on this film. Going back to your day-to-day life, you kind of have to put your armor back on. You go back out into the world and adjust, so it is a bittersweet process.

Jason Hall is making his directorial debut with this film. So, what was the experience like working with him?

This story is a very personal story – the veterans whom Jason shadowed have become very important to him and he really had a deep understanding of the psychology of what it was like to be in Iraq and then to come home. He spent a lot of time with them. Jason immersed himself in this world for the past five years of his life. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder affects those who have survived extremely traumatic events, and can affect anyone who has experienced trauma. As humans, we all will experience trauma to some degree within our lives.

I just think Jason had this incredible insight. He was able to personalize his own trauma and was very open about some of those issues. He had this way of making us really feel very connected, attached, vulnerable and empathetic to the material. He pushed us to explore emotional territory that wasn’t always comfortable. He was constantly pushing me, which I believe to be necessary. You need that push in order to lunge deeper into your work. Jason was the architect of that; working with him was a transformative experience in my life and work.

Slip Dress by Palace Costume

You’re on set of the production of Red Sea Diving Resort. Are you able to share with us any details about your role in this film, your character, and how you came on board the project?

Absolutely! I had spent a lot of time promoting Magnificent Seven and The Girl on the Train which was a completely new territory for me. After working on Magnificent Seven and Girl on the Train, I wanted to refocus on work, so I sought out a new project. I was reading a lot of material, but I wasn’t really connecting with any of what I was reading until I read the Red Sea Diving Resort. Then, it was all I could think about! Gideon Raff [creator and writer of Homeland] wrote the script and is directing the film. It is one of the most compelling, shocking, and evocative stories that I have ever read. It is based on a true story about a group of Mossad operatives in the 70’s with an incredible cast and crew. It’s amazing that the story hasn’t been told. But I’m glad Gideon uncovered this gem.

That’s very exciting to be involved with such stellar and exciting projects! Not only have you been busy with films, but fashion is keeping you busy as well. You are the new face of Chloé’s signature fragrance for their ten-year anniversary. How would you describe the Chloé woman and what about the brand speaks to you?

My collaboration with Chloé was a very organic one. Their brand philosophy is very aligned with my own personal aesthetic: effortless, easy, and elevated. It celebrates strong women who embrace their own femininity and freedom. The campaign film was directed by a woman named Stephanie DiGusto, who directed a film called The Dancer which is this incredibly poetic and lyrical film. I was really excited to work with a female director, and the theme of the campaign was freedom and female empowerment. Stephanie’s approach was very cinematic. We shot in South Africa in January, and the commercial itself looks like a film. It’s funny, when I was shooting the campaign, I had a feeling that I was going to be shooting my next film here. At that point, I didn’t know I was going to be doing Red Sea; but sure enough, here I am.

Coat by 3.1 Phillip Lim, Slip Dress by Palace Costume

Skirt and belt by Michael Kors

It all came full circle for you then. I am just guessing that in some ways you must feel like you are finally living the dream you had from childhood while growing up on those Time Warner classic movies. Is “the dream” constantly changing as it becomes a reality? What do you foresee in the future?

In my experience, I found that the more I tried to will something into existence, the more resistant it became. Now, I think that when you allow yourself to be the most open to all possibilities, that is when the most exciting things begin to happen. I live with a willingness to be surprised, to let life take me where it wants to. You can make your mind up about something, but in the end you really have very little say in things. I think it is important to live in the moment and to be open to life.

The sun is setting in South Africa. As I thank her for her time and juggling all the many distractions of being on set while managing to hold down an interview with charm and eloquence. She interjects just before we hang up, “The biggest distraction was that gorgeous sunset!”

 

Cardigan by No. 21, Vintage Slip and Boots from Palace Costume.

Dress and Belt by Alexander McQueen

Hair by Lona Vigi using Clairol at Starworks Artists, Makeup by Sabrina Bedrani using Dior, Nails by Morgan McGuire using Chanel, Prop styling by Ali Gallagher, Art Direction by Louis Liu, Editor Marc Sifuentes, Photographer’s 1st Assistant Jordan Jennings , 2nd Assistant Luc Richard Elle, Digital Tech Logan Bingham, Producer Monae Caviness @ Jones Management and XTheStudio, Stylist Assistant Jake Sammis.‡

FROM CONEY ISLAND, WITH LOVE

Photography by Greg Swales | Styling by Marc Sifuentes | Casting by Gabriel Ray | Model Lais Ribeiro @ Women Management

 

Dress by Alexander Wang, Diamond earrings by Modern Moghul, Necklace by Van Cleef & Arpels

Young Love, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Leather Dress by Michael Kors, Peplum Belt by Zana Bayne, Lace boots by Giuseppe Zanotti, Vintage Emanuel Ungaro Sunglasses from Eye Candy NY, Earrings by Victoria Hayes, Ring by Modern Moghul

 

Dress by Roberto Cavalli, Fur stole by Georgine, Earrings by Victoria Hayes, Ring Modern Moghul Sandals by Valentino

The Hangout, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Nikita and The Boys, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Dress by Brandon Maxwell, Mesh bodysuit from Purple Passion NYC, Stockings by Wolford, Sunglasses from Eye Candy NYC, Rings by Modern Moghul

Joy, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Chain Corset by the Blonds, Lingerie by Dolce & Gabbana, Fur by Georgine, Boots by Pleaser, Rings by Modern Moghul

Girls Off the Q Train, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Dress and Lingerie by Dolce & Gabbana, Hat from Screaming Mimi’s Vintage, Fur by Dennis Basso, Cigarette holder from Eye Candy NYC, Boots by Louboutin

Marco and Company, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Dress by Philipp Plein, Sequined booties by Christian Louboutin, Bracelets by Modern Moghul

Ryan AKA “RyRY”, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Dress by Roberto Cavalli, Fur by Adrienne Landau

The Taste of Sun, Coney Island, NYC, July, 2017

 

Dress by The Blonds, Mesh bodysuit from Purple Passion NYC

Hair by Hikaru Hirano, Makeup by Victor Herna @ B&A using Estée Lauder, Manicure by Narina Chan @ Wilhelmina using OPI – Push and Shove, Creative Direction by Louis Liu, Video by Lavoisier Clemente, Photographer’s Assistant Jean Pierre Bonnet and Valerie Burke, Stylist Assistant Marion Aguas and Benjamin Price, Production by XTheStudio. Special thanks to Blowpro. ‡

 

LAST NIGHT I DREAMT THAT SOMEBODY LOVED ME

Photography by Hadar Pitchon | Styling by Marc Anthony George

Coat by Adrienne Landau, Suit by Vivienne Westwood, Vintage shirt from Screaming Mimi’s Vintage, Necklace, stylist’s studio, Rings by Joy of Crystals

Coat and shirt by Dries Van Noten, Shawl by Screaming Mimi’s Vintage, Necklace by Joy of Crystals

Jacket by Just Cavalli, Rings by Joy of Crystals

Vintage robe and scarf from Screaming Mimi’s Vintage, Fur Shawl by Adrienne Landau

 

Coat by John Varvatos, Shirt and undershirt by Burberry, Vintage scarf from Screaming Mimi’s Vintage

 

Sweater by JW Anderson

Vintage shirt from Screaming Mimi’s Vintage, Pants by Jil Sander, Scarf by John Varvatos, Vintage scarf clip, stylist’s own, Rings by Joy of Crystals, (right pinky) Ring by Alexis Bitar

Suit, shirt and boots by Roberto Cavalli, Vintage neckpiece from Screaming Mimi’s, Vintage Pocket square by Ralph Lauren

Coat and pants by Valentino, Vintage shirt hat and necklace from Screaming Mimi’s Vintage, Rings by Joy of Crystals (right pinky) Ring by Alexis Bittar

Coat, sweater and pants by Versace, Necklace by Screaming Mimi’s Vintage, Boots by John Varvatos

Grooming by Mike Fernandez using Evo Hair Products and Glossier on skin, Editor Marc Sifuentes, Production by XTheStudio, Special Thanks to Cole Harrell and Tai Heng Cheng for opening their home in Tuxedo, New York for our location.

COAT, CHECK!

Photography by Johnny Vicari | Stylist Alexander Paul |Model Alix Angjeli @ The Lions

Jacket and Boots by Off White, Earrings by Maria Black, Underwear by Balmain.

Coat by Jil Sander, Dress by Narciso Rodriguez, Earrings by Maria Black

Dress by Alexander Wang, Coat by Wanda Nylon, Earrings by Maria Black

Coat by Nomia, Pants by Brandon Maxwell, Belt by Rodarte, Earring by Maria Black

Coat by Versace, Earrings by Maria Black

Coat by Sacai, Boots by Off White, Earrings by Verdura.

Coat by Thom Browne, Boots by Off White, Earrings by Maria Black

Coat by Gucci, Bra by Araks, Boots by Balmain

Coat by Marc Jacobs, Boots by Off White

Coat by The Row, Shirt by No. 21

Coat by Stella McCartney, Dress by Adam Selman, Boots by Off White

Makeup by Kanako Takase @ Streeters USA using NARS Cosmetics, Hair by Shingo Shibata @ The Wall Group, Manicure by Jini Lim Using Chanel le vernis, Digital Tech Pablo Serrano, DP Earnest Martin, Stylist Assistants Chase Coughlin and Isoke Samuel, Studio Assistant Ryan Stenger, Production by Dustin Mansyur, Production Assistants Benjamin Price and Sol Thompson, Editor Marc Sifuentes. Special Thanks to Sunset Studios Brooklyn and Philipp Haemmerle.

UNTITLED (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017

Photography by Ruo Bing Li | Styling by Majid Karrouch |Model Jia Tong @ Muse NYC

UNTITLED 1 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Kimono by Cheng-Huai Chuang, Sandals by Coach, Stockings by Purple Passion NYC, Belt by Michael Kors, Earrings by Victoria Hayes

UNTITLED 2 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017

UNTITLED 3 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Kimono by Cheng-Huai Chuang, Sandals by Coach, Latex Stockings by Purple Passion NYC, Belt by Michael Kors, Earrings by Victoria Hayes

UNTITLED 4 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Dress and Jacket (worn underneath dress) by Sharon Wang, Turtle neck by Missoni, Earrings by Shop Sideara and Flower headpiece made by Stylist

UNTITLED 5 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Dress by Sacai, Shirt (worn underneath dress) by Claudia Lee, Earrings by Lele Sadoughi

UNTITLED 6 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Jacket by Michael Kors, Turtle Neck (worn underneath jacket) by Johna Stone, Leather Mask by Purple Passion NYC (customized by stylist)

UNTITLED 7 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Total Look by Claudia Li, Belt made by Stylist, Earrings by Lele Sadoughi

UNTITLED 8 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Dress by Roberto Cavalli, Earrings by Cara Croninger

UNTITLED 9 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Dress by Jill Sander, Suit (worn underneath dress) by Jarret, Earrings by Lele Sadoughi

UNTITLED 10 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Suit by Victoria Hayes, Earrings by Lele Sadoughi

UNTITLED 11 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Dress by Carven

UNTITLED 12 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Jacket by Dama, Jacket (worn underneath jacket) by Victoria Hayes

UNTITLED 13 (FROM THE SERIES: KITANO), 2017
Dress by Coach, Shirt (worn underneath dress) by Alejandro Alonso Rojas, Earrings by Victoria Hayes

Makeup by Chiao Li Hsu, Hair by Takayoshi Tsukisawa using Oribe, Manicure by Naoko Saita using “PRITI NYC” nail polishes, Art Direction by Louis Liu, Stylist’s Assistent Sideara Weisgrau, Makeup Assistant Stacy Buch, Director Zexi Qi & Video by Patrick Chen, Editor Marc Sifuentes, Production by Benjamin Price

DAO-YI CHOW AND MAXWELL OSBORNE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL NYC

Born and bred purveyors of New York cool, Public School are surpassing their own successes by delivering their signature synergy of street and substance to their women’s collections.

Photography by Bon Duke | Styling by Kate Carnegie | Featuring Models Ana Christina @ New York Models, Sahara Lin @ Elite Models, Jordan Legessa @ Heroes | Interview by Alan Bindler
All Clothing by Public School NYC

Luxury Streetwear. To an outsider, it can seem an oxymoron of sorts. The history of streetwear is long and storied, the specifics of which are hotly debated in the comments sections of 21st century cultural hubs like Complex and Hypebeast. Born out of surf and skate culture of the late 1970s and infused with urban wear aesthetics of the 1990s, luxury streetwear combines these influences with the timeless quality and craftsmanship one would expect from European maisons. Founded in 2008 and relaunched in 2012, Public School has been evolving the genre to great accolades for nearly a decade, defining what is cool and coveted by a rising generation of luxury consumers. Originally a men’s label, designers Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne launched their women’s line in Fall 2014, marking a seamless transition for the go-to brand of born-and-bred New York cool. 2017 is a benchmark year for Public School, with the volume of their women’s business about to surpass the men’s. Here, Iris Covet Book chats with the duo about designing for women, why luxury streetwear is so relevant now, and the new definition of luxury.

I understand that this year the women’s business is surpassing the men’s business. Do you think that’s going to affect how you show the brand in the future and the overall brand story?

Maxwell Osborne: I think in the longer term, for us, yeah, women’s business is growing and it has turned into a bigger business than our men’s business, which we kind of knew would happen going into it, and I think we just change with the times and really figure out what’s best with us in terms of how you show and release products. And I think that’s also just a sign of where we are in general in the marketplace and how women and men shop, and how our retailers buy the products. So it’s not surprising that our women’s business is bigger than our men’s business. I think we’ll always be known as a menswear brand first and foremost, but it’s actually also refreshing to have the women’s business grow at the pace it’s been growing.

Can you speak a little bit more about this and your vision for who your female customer is?

MO: Actually, it’s evolving. Our women’s business is still so new, so we’re still learning more information about our Public School Girl. We’re finding out now it’s actually Public School Women as well. They blend, and now we’re learning that Public School is not just a girl line, it’s also a woman’s line, maybe even more so than we thought. So we’re continually learning about our own brand through the people that wear it and buy it. Right now our lines have been blurred in terms of who the girl is. It’s really just this girl who’s transformed into a woman. It’s great to watch.

That’s exciting. It’s almost as if your customer is growing with you.

MO: Yeah, basically. They’re maturing with us, for sure. Do you have any specific muses? MO: I think we have a lot of different ideas of who this woman is – there’s not just one specific girl, but it’s the girl on the go, the girl who lives in a metropolitan city, who knows what’s up and goes from work to drinks, or work to dinner to an art gallery to a party and never really has to change. She’s comfortable in her own skin. Obviously all very cliché, but that’s exactly who we design for in terms of being a New Yorker or being in Tokyo or another big city. Just a girl that’s on the move and very comfortable in what she does. She’s not just one girl. It’s the girl of many faces.

What are some things you find yourself thinking about when you’re designing for women that you didn’t think about when you were designing exclusively for men?

MO: The idea of ease and femininity is something that we never really thought about for men. We’ve kind of softened that up because a lot of women just want to be feminine. And it’s like, what’s the reason you’re buying a Public School women’s dress? We’re not floral and ruffles all the time. We’re different than that. So what’s our take on that? I think that’s the challenge we always have. A good challenge in designing for women, for our customers, is what’s that line of femininity which also makes it very Public School. So we’re always challenging ourselves and figuring out that piece.

In today’s market, department stores, even luxury ones, are full of sale racks. When you go to an industry trade show, it’s a sea of booths for small labels that no one may ever hear of; It can be kind of easy to get discouraged from a designer’s perspective. Do you ever feel that? That there’s just so much out there, and how do you find that voice?

MO: Yeah, we do feel like that. To be a designer and also be conscious of what’s going on, and knowing that nobody really needs to produce another piece of clothing in this world because we have enough to survive. But at the same time you can’t say that because it’s what you do and it’s what you love. It’s refreshing when you see a brand that has a clear voice and understanding of who they are, as opposed to a bunch of brands that are just doing the same thing and fighting for the same thing. I think that gets a little frustrating. Not discouraging, but more frustrating. As an artist, you want to see other people get excited and inspired. It’s exciting when you see a brand that has its own voice, its own creativity, and its own lane.

Public School is a luxury brand, influenced by a streetwear aesthetic. Some would call that ironic, as there are certain socioeconomic factors that come into play there. Also, when a brand is streetwear influenced, there’s a certain authenticity and exclusivity that contributes to the price point, as well as the quality. How do you balance that, and do you have any thoughts on the irony of having to appeal to a “cool” consumer, but also a consumer that can spend a certain amount of money on products of this quality?

MO: The quality and fabrication help dictate those prices, so showing a baseball cap, but in a different fabric, automatically takes it to a designer price because you used designer fabric. We’ve always tried to blend what we love, like the streets and the highs and the lows — for sure. That’s what we always want to do. We just try to blend those pieces in and own our lane. It’s not just street, it’s not just high fashion or designer. It’s just a mosh pit of it all, all in one. And look at the market place – I’m trying to think of any street brands that are like, really street, but offer high-end pricing without the quality matching. Usually it’s just inspired by the street but still very much luxury. You can say that for Vetements, especially; these ideas of street pieces but done in a not-so-street way. It’s not just a basic French terry, there’s always more elements to it, so it makes sense to me, it warrants that. I don’t think of it as streetwear at luxury pricing for no reason. There is a reason for it.

Dao-Yi Chow: There’s perceived value and there’s inherent value. From a streetwear standpoint, I think brands that have been able to take the perceived value, and take the product up to a luxury price point, I think that’s been the magic or allure of what those brands do. But what we do, it’s inherent value; from the fabrications, from where we’re making the clothes, from the trim that we’re developing… there’s tangible reasons why the things cost what they do. I think that there’s a distinction between those two. You have brands or designers who are able to charge more money for goods and position it from a luxury standpoint based on a perceived value, and whether the actual clothes do or do not merit the price points – it’s not my place to say. For the most part, we try to price everything based on what they cost us.

Luxury and designer clothing used to be reserved for a certain segment of the population, and obviously from an economic standpoint it still is, but this explosion, for lack of a better word, of luxury streetwear, what is that telling us about society? How is that a reflection of the changing face of the luxury consumer?

DC: I think it’s sort of a breakdown of barriers, judgement, and people – streetwear is streetwear because it’s what’s happening now. That’s what streetwear has been – what is happening on the street right now. How do we address it, and how do we take that messaging culturally and turn that into something you wear on your body? And so I think that there’s a breakdown of what people think is important now. What used to be important is no longer important, and so in a lot of ways the barriers are down and people can just sort of be who they are and not feel like they have to pretend.

So there’s not a specific mold for the luxury consumer anymore?

DC: Yeah, I think that’s also from a consumer standpoint, that people are not like, “oh, it’s from this European house and it costs $2,000 and that means that it’s luxury.” Luxury has opened up. The definition of what luxury is has broadened.

There’s a lot of conversation now in fashion press with regards to sustainability and technology. Beyond recycled textiles, what’s the future of fashion as you guys see it with regards to these topics? How do you see the industry evolving, and how are you addressing it in your own work?

DC: The fashion industry in general needs to figure out how to affect its carbon imprint on the world. We were actually in Copenhagen at a summit on fashion sustainability. So for us, it needs to start with being responsible, and not just being responsible in the things we do and create but being responsible for what we imagine, think about, and ideate. Nothing is being created without the thought or the intent, so the intent needs to come from a sustainable place, and we try to work with as few factories as possible. We try to have visibility and clarity on where the products that we’re using are coming from, but ultimately we are not 100% guaranteed. We’re also in a business that makes things we really don’t need. That’s tough to say as a designer, as a person who has a career in fashion. What we do is not very sustainable at all. I think we’re trying to think about it more and affect it in ways where we’re looking at the life cycles of garments that we create and the materials they come from. In a couple of upcoming collaborations, that is sort of the main idea and the main rallying point that we’re trying to get behind. So I think in general, our thought process needs to be sustainable, the ideas need to be sustainable, and then subsequently what we produce and create off of those ideas will be more sustainable. But, at the same time, I wouldn’t say that we are torch bearers.

Speaking of collaborations, you’ve collaborated with a wide array of brands including Tumi, J. Crew, Oliver Peoples, Fitbit, Jordan – could you explain how collaborations really work and why you’re so drawn to doing them?

MO: You know, collaborations are obviously the meeting point in the middle of the two brands. Each brand shares in the other’s aesthetic, but for us when we do these collaborations we’re really just working with the best in what they do that actually fit our lifestyle outside of what we do. So, to work with Tumi, it’s easy because we travel so much, designing luggage was easy for us. It’s like, what do we want from our luggage? And we obviously pick and choose which ones are best for us and the brand. We grew up wearing Jordans. We travel all the time. I wear glasses all the time. So it comes from a true place. It’s not like we’re pulling them out of a hat just to do them. It’s actually coming from things that we’re going to use, and that’s how we design it. It’s how we’re going to use it. We’re not doing it for anybody else, really.

You have a collaboration with Moët that’s coming out also. Can you tell me a little bit more about that.

MO: We’re going to be drinking a lot. (laughs) I guess that’s a start, right? There’s the reason for that one.

DC: Moët is sort of a culmination of this idea of celebration for us, having moments to be able to celebrate and share with other people. And that process actually was really cool because we were able to travel out to Epernay where the wine and the champagne are made. And how the Maison treats it as such an artform. It was eye-opening to see that entire process and see how important that process is to the brand. That was one of the perks of being able to collab with a brand like Moët, which has hundreds and hundreds of years of experience and history.

You’ve been outspoken with regards to your support of Black Lives Matter, and your Fall runway show included caps printed with the slogan “Make America New York.” How important are political movements to fashion, both as an industry and also in direct relation to the clothes that we wear? And does one sort of inform the other?

MO: What’s going on in the current climate of the world is very much where we draw inspiration from. What’s going on right now is what we’re thinking about when designing those collections. We are aware of whatever is going on in the world, in our culture and that’s what we try to put on the runway. So, if it’s about politics then it’s about politics. Black Lives Matter, for me, was the moment when I was just really frustrated. I definitely could have been way more outspoken. It’s cool to have a voice and for it to be listened to for a second. For the runway when we did “Make America New York”– what’s great about New York is that it’s a city that is a melting pot and you can’t hide that fact.

You have a call to action that you label WNL, which has multiple meanings; Where New York Lives, We Need Leaders… Can you explain a little bit more about this?

MO: WNL just sort of started out as an internal mantra, and when we say call to action it’s not really a call to action to anyone else other than ourselves. Originally, it was just highlighting and focusing on friends of ours who we felt were leaders in their particular industry, from a creative standpoint. It’s slowly morphed into more than just a platform where, especially now in this climate, we can express and demonstrate whatever our feelings of activism are and align with other groups and organizations who feel similarly. It’s not meant to be a preachy thing at all and hopefully it doesn’t come off that way. But it’s a reminder to ourselves that we need to do something bigger than clothes or making money. I think it’s a helpful reminder for us to be able to focus on our career, while simultaneously focusing on helping each other or helping people who don’t have as much, or helping people to give a voice to those who might not have one.

And is there any specific charity or philanthropic initiative that you guys are currently working on or actively working on with Public School, as far as that’s concerned?

DC: We work with several organizations. There’s an organization that I’m a board member of that’s called Apex for Youth. It’s the largest Asian American mentoring program here in the states that provides mentorship and college preparation for children of all ethnicities, but focused on Asian Americans that live below the poverty line. We also work with the National Center for Learning Disabilities, and we are planning to partner with the ACLU. We donated the proceeds from the sales of our runway show hats to the ACLU. We’re trying to stay active.

   For more information about Public School, please visit PublicSchoolNYC.com – Makeup/Grooming by Laura Stiassni using Sisley @The Wall Group, Hair by Lizzie Arneson @ BRIDGE using Oribe. Art Direction by Louis Liu, Editor Marc Sifuentes, Photographer’s 1st Assistant Mariah Postlethwaite, 2nd Assistant Tom McKiver, Photo Intern Jeremy Hall, BTS DP/Digital Manager Casey Showalter, Senior Digital Tech Nick Korompilas, Production by XTheStudio. Special Thanks to Pier59 Studios.

WHAT’S NEW PUSSYCAT?

Photography by Ricky Michaels | Styling by Liz Rundeaken | Market Editor Benjamin Price | Models – Derek Drummond @Wilhelmina Models, Apple Drysdale, Cheeky Ma, Jacopo Olmo @Heroes Models, Reid Rohling @Fusion Models, Keltie Straith @Elite Models, Jun Sung @Fusion Models, Sam Swan @State Mgmt, Xiara Waller @Fusion Models

From Left to Right: Jacopo Olmo Instagram@theinsaneballer17, Jacket by Gucci, Tee by Nike, Necklace by Louis Vuitton, Shoes by Adidas and all other jewelry model’s own. Keltie Straith Instagram@keltiestraith, Top and Skirt by Opening Ceremony, Puffer Scarf and Leggings by Pinko. Apple Drysdale Instagram@killedthemfortheurl, Puffer by Pinko, Sculpted Bodysuit by Calvin Klein Underwear, Pants by Vintage Fox Racing motorcross pants. Xiara Waller Instagram@xiarawaller, Bodysuit and Pants by Ben Taverniti Unravel Project, Glasses by Vintage, Gloves by Carolina Amato. Derek Drummond Instagram@poster.boy, Sweater and shorts by Gucci, Wrap by Everlast, Earring by Laruicci. Cheeky Ma Instagram@cheekymaa, Top and Pants by Versus Versace, All jewelry model’s own. Sam Swan Instagram@swan_sam, Jacket by Colin Locascio, Pants by Calvin Klein Jeans High Rise Extreme Wide Leg Denim Jeans. Jun Sung Instagram@ kim_ junsung_ , Sweater by No.21, Trousers and Shoes by Versus Versace

In the streets of Brooklyn, the new wave of youth is now running the fashion game. Luxury brands such as Gucci, Balenciaga, Saint Laurent, and Versace are now looking to the styling that’s happening live – on social media and on the streets. Millennial fashion is all about individuality, juxtaposition of colors, ironic semiotics, and flipping fashion on its head. From Demna Gvasalia’s high-end/low-end mashup at Balenciaga to Alessandro Michele’s new, extraterrestrial fashions at Gucci, the new era of couture runs the gambit. When designer sweatpants and hoodies are paired with stilettos and Hermès watches, it becomes clear that the previously banal is now the pinnacle of luxury. Ateliers throughout New York, London, Milan, and Paris are taking note from the young social media stars and influencers more than ever before; a new “youthquake” on the rise.


left to right: on Jun Sung Top and Sweatshirt by Versus Versace, Chaps Shorts by Marcelo Burlon, on Reid Rohling Top by Colin Locascio and Pants by Marcelo Burlon, on Derek Drummond Sweatshirt by COS, Pants by Marcelo Burlon Neck Wrap by Everlast, on Jacopo Olmo Top by Nike Pants by COS, Necklace by Louis Vuitton.

left to right: on Sam Swan Dress by Lacoste, on Derek Drummond Tracksuit by Olivia Anthony, Neckwrap by Everlast, Rings by Lariucci, on Xiara Waller Full Look by Public School, on Jun Sung Jacket by Lacoste, T-Shirt by Bernhard Wilhelm

Reid Rohling Instagram @reedrolling All clothing by Gucci, Hat by Atari, all jewelry model’s own.

From Left to Right: On Kiara: Sweatshirt and Trousers by Sportmax, and Sneakers by Adidas; On Keltie: Jacket by Sportmax, Leggings by Pinko, and Shoes by Nike; On Cheeky: Top and Pants by Namilia, Bra and Underwear by Calvin Klein Underwear, and Shoes by Nike; On Sam: Sweatshirt by Public School, Skirt by Pinko, and Shoes by Nike; On Apple: Top and Shorts by Namilia, Socks by Adidas and Shoes by Y-3.

on Cheeky Ma Coat and Dickie by Alexander Wang, Pants by Olivia Anthony.

Makeup by Yuui using M.A.C., Hair by Mike Fernandez using EVO hair products and Glossier on skin, Art direction by Kayla Kern, Stylist’s assistants Alycen Case, Caroline Montgomery and Madeline Shownkeen. Assistant Market Editor Sol Thompson. Retouching for Ricky Michaels’ images by Grzegorz Skoneczny / COLOR WORKZ

WEB EXCLUSIVE – WAITING ON A FRIEND

Photography by David Mollé  | Styling and Creative Direction by Donté McGuine
Hair by Wade Lee | Makeup by Juan Jaar | Casting Director and Production by Sahtia Rivers
Models – Noah @DNA , Rocky (Rockwell) @IMG, Darius @IMG, Jack @Ford, and Gareth @Fusion
BTS Video Clips by Benjamin Price

Rocky – Full Look by Cedric Charlier, Shoes by Florsheim | Gareth – Full Look by Cedric Charlier, Shoes by Syro

Darius – Full Look by Cedric Charlier, Shoes by Florsheim | Jack – Top by Selected Homme, Pants by Cedric Charlier, Shoes by Syro

Noah – Top by David Hart, Pants by Cedric Charlier, Shoes by Syro

Left Image: Rocky – Top by Viden, Scarf: Stylist’s own, Pants by David Hart, Shoes by Syro | Darius – Shirt by Krammer and Stoudt, Inner Shirt: Devereaux, Pants by Selected Homme, Shoes by Gucci
Right Image: Rocky – Full Look by Cedric Charlier, Shoes by Florsheim

Top Image: Rocky – Jacketby Private Policy, Shirt by Cedric Charlier

Bottom Image: Noah – Top by Viden, Pants by Private Policy, Scarf: Stylist’s own

 

Rocky – Top by Viden, Scarf: Stylist’s own, Vintage Louis Vuitton Monogram Leather Soccer Ball

Darius – Top by David Hart, Jeans by Levi’s

Jack – Sweater by Viden, Pants by Selected Homme, Shoes by Syro

Gareth -Pants by Private Policy, Shirt by Krammer and Stoudt, Pants by David Hart, Shoes by Syro

Gareth – Suit by Krammer and Stoudt

Noah – Pants by Private Policy , Shoes by Syro

Photographer’s Assistant Will Glaser | Hair Stylist’s Assistant Melissa Styles
Special thanks to Annabel Claire Schwartz and Felipe Araujo for providing their SOHO Loft for the location of this shoot