WILD COUNTRY

Coat by Harris Wharf London, Hoodie by The Rail, Necklace by Tevin Vincent, Cowboy Hat Stylist’s Own

Photography by Samuel Ramirez | Styling by Ton Aguilar | Grooming by Jojo Torres | Model: Lucas Satherly @ IMG

Jacket by Represent, Pants by Dior Homme, Necklace by Tevin Vincent

 

Bodysuit by Madewell

 

Shirt by Saint Laurent, Necklace by Tevin Vincent

Turtleneck by Joseph, Headpiece and Hat Stylist’s Own

LUNAR NEW YEAR

Photography: Dennis Tejero (@dennistejero) | Model: Ting Yan at Silent Models (@xitingyan2387) | Styling: Marti Arcucci (@martiarcucci) | Hair: Takashi Yusa (@takashiyusa) | Makeup: Michael Chua (@michaelchuabeauty) | Casting: Eric Cano (@cano_castings) | Set Producer: Jess Zuluaga (@jesszuluagaO) | Photo Assistants: Nathan Sweet and Bryant Lopez

Dress by Alena Akhmadullina, Earrings by Laruicci, Vintage Ring

Dress by Alena Akhmadullina, Vintage Pants,  Earrings by Laruicci, Vintage Ring, Boots by Lena Erziak

Dress by Georgine, Coat by Victoria Hayes, Boots by Lena Erziak

Vintage Sequin Top, Vintage Levi’s Jeans, Shoes by Lena Erziak

Suit by CHAE, Turtleneck by Victoria Hayes, Vintage Shoes by Manolo Blahnik

Vintage Top, Earrings by Laruicci

Dress by Kalmanovich, Stockings by Spanx

Blouse by Georgine, Pants by Victoria Hayes, Vintage Shoes by Manolo Blahnik

Dress by Victoria Hayes, Vintage Sheer Shirt, Vintage Levi’s Jeans, Vintage Shoes by Manolo Blahnik, Rings by Ralph Masri

Dress by DELACRUZ, Shoes by Lena Erziak, Stockings by Spanx

WHO WILL STOP THE RAIN

Full look by JUUN.J, Shoes by Ellery

Photography: Dennis Tejero (@dennistejero) | Model: Brynn Bonner at Red Models (@theloneblackrose) | Styling: Cornelius Lafayette (@corneliuslafayette) | Makeup: Michael Chua (@michaelchuabeauty) | Hair: Jenni Wimmerstedt (@ivainsane) | Casting: Eric Cano (@cano_castings)| Photo Assistants: Tim Tamayo (@jalatimyo) and Bryant Lopez (@bryantglopez) | Retouching by Lara Ostertag

Full Look by Ellery

Full Look by Ellery

Jacket by N. Hoolywood, Coat by Christopher Kane, Pants by MISBHV, Bag by Thom Browne

Shirt by N. Hoolywood, Vest by MISBHV

Blazer by Thom Browne, Vest and Skirt by Alexander Wang, Shoes by N. Hoolywood

Blazer by Moon Choi, Pants by N. Hoolywood x Dickies

Full Look by Camilla & Marc, Shoes by N. Hoolywood

Full Look by JUUN.J, Shoes by Ellery

Full Look by JUUN.J, Shoes by Ellery

EMMIE

Dress by Zaid Affas, Earring by Vanessa Mooney

Photography by Raul Romo (@raulromo) | Styling by Katie Qian (@katieqian) | Hair and Makeup by Francie Tomalonis (@francieluxe) | Model is Emmie Nielsen @ IMG (@emmienielsen @imgmodels)

Dress by Zaid Affas, Earring by Vanessa Mooney

Dress by Zaid Affas

Jacket by Malan Breton, Earrings by Ettika

Dress and Jacket by Zaid Affas

Dress by Maison the Faux

Dress by Maison the Faux

Dress by Maison the Faux

Dress by Maison the Faux

Dress by Maison the Faux, Shoes by Nike

Dress by Maison the Faux, Shoes by Nike

Jacket by Malan Breton, Earrings by Ettika

Jacket by Malan Breton, Earrings by Ettika

Dress by Pam Hogg, Earrings by Ettika

Earrings by Ettika

NO VACANCY

All Clothing by Tom Ford

Photography by Go Minami
Styling by Jungle Lin
Model by Flora Carter @ MUSE Models
Hair by Koji Ichikawa for LAICALE
Makeup by Ayana Awata using MAC Cosmetics

Top Image: Top by Jil Sander, Coat by Roberto Cavalli, Shoes by Lacoste
Bottom Image: Coat by Oscar de la Renta, Sweater Dress by Lacoste, Shoes by Mulberry

Turtleneck by Ulla Johnson, Coat by Jil Sander, Shoes by Thom Browne

Top Image: Suit by Adeam, Shirt by Salvatore Ferragamo
Bottom Image: Coat and Skirt by Issey Miyake, Sweater by Prabal Gurung

Coat by Mulberry, Sweater, Shirt, Pants and Shoes by 3.1 Phillip Lim

Top Image: All Clothing by Thom Browne
Bottom Image: All Clothing by Mulberry

WINDOW SHOPPING

Photography by Ruo Bing Li
Styling by Krisana Sotelo @ The Only Agency
Model Alexandra Elizabeth @ The Society

Silk green and black print dress and silk black belt worn over the shoulder by Marc Jacobs, Vinyl body corset by Alexander Wang, Crystal headband and kitten heels by Tom Ford, Spandex liquid leggings Stylist own

Sofa – Cloud by Richard Shemtov, Table – Double Zero by Richard Shemtov

Green and black print, silk dress and black silk belt worn over the shoulder by Marc Jacobs, Vinyl body corset by Alexander Wang, Crystal headband and kitten heels by Tom Ford, Spandex liquid leggings Stylist own

Sofa – Cloud by Richard Shemtov, Table – Double Zero by Richard Shemtov

Black velvet embroidered cape by Erdem, black latex cape + crystal and latex belt worn over the neck by Tableaux Vivents, crystal earrings and hair clip by Area

Mirror – Ledge by Michael Solis, Desk – Halo by Karim Rashid

Crystal embroidered colorful dress by Tom Ford, clear vinyl jacket by Philipp Plein, crystal embroidered kitten heels by Tom Ford, green spandex liquid full bodysuit stylist own, pastel pink pop socks by Maria La Rosa

Dining Table and Chairs – Margot by Sarah Fels, Stool – Jedi by Richard Shemtov

Crystal embroidered colorful dress by Tom Ford, clear vinyl jacket by Philipp Plein, crystal embroidered kitten heels by Tom Ford, green spandex liquid full bodysuit stylist own, pastel pink pop socks by Maria La Rosa

Dining Table and Chairs – Margot by Sarah Fels, Stool – Jedi by Richard Shemtov

Green and pink sequin dress with nude body cape by Gucci, Pink spandex leggings stylists own, pink pop socks by Falke, crystal sandal by Area

Sofa – landscape by Nina Edwards Anker

Pastel fur coat by Sies Marjan, turquoise sequin arm bands by DSquared2, purple latex liquid full bodysuit stylist’s own, pink pop socks by Maria La Rosa, crystal sneakers by Gucci

Cabinet – Fu Console by Nick Dine

Grey wool sweater with stones by Christopher Kane, metal mesh skirt worn around the neck by Paco Rabanne

Sofa – Deluxe by Richard Shemtov, Table – Four Forty by Michael Solis

Grey wool sweater with stones by Christopher Kane, metal mesh skirt worn around the neck by Paco Rabanne

Sofa – Deluxe by Richard Shemtov, Table – Four Forty by Michael Solis

Crystal and tulle sheer top by Givenchy, latex skirt with crystals by Tableaux Vivents, blue spandex liquid full bodysuit stylist own, crystal and mesh stockings by Area, vinyl and leather heel by Alexander Wang

Bench – Pipeline by Harry Allen

Iridescent vinyl jacket by Area, mesh nude gloves by Carolina Amato, pink pop socks by Maria La Rosa, crystal multi-colored sneakers by Gucci

Sofa – Stealth by Richard Shemtov

Makeup by Liset Garza @ The Wall Group using MAC Cosmetics
Hair by Yukiko Tajima @See Management
Production by Benjamin Price of LEO Creatives
Fashion Assistants Patrick Surach and Ashley Wooten
Production intern Louis Kang
Special thanks to Aaron Shemtov of Dune, for more information visit: dune-ny.com

PLASTIC FANTASTIC

Photography by Ruo Bing Li | Styling by Connie Berg Model Manami Kinoshita @ Muse Model Management

 Blazer and Pants (With Belt) by 3.1 Phillip Lim, Earrings by Rachel Comey, Shoes by Sigerson Morrison 

Blazer by 3.1 Phillip Lim, Earrings by Rachel Comey

Blazer and Corset by Tibi, Earrings by Rachel Comey, Shoes by Nicholas K

Blazer and Corset by Tibi, Earrings by Rachel Comey

Vest and Trousers by Alexander Wang

 Blazer and Trousers by Rachel Comey, Top by Oresund Iris

Blazer by Nomia, Choker Stylist’s Own

Top by COS, Earrings by Monies

Top by Oresund Iris, Shoes by Nicholas K, Earrings by Rachel Comey

Makeup by Liset Garza @ The Wall Group, Hair by Kiyo Igarashi, Manicure by Yukie Miyakawa @ Kate Ryan Using YSL Beauty, BTS Video by Xixi, Stylist Assistants Yinka Akinmola and Belle Bakst, Production by XTheStudio, Special Thanks to Splashlight Studios

HIROKO KOSHINO: A TOUCH OF BAUHAUS

Please join us on Thursday, November 1st from 6 to 8 PM at WhiteBox in NYC and meet Hiroko Koshino at the opening of her exhibit,  Hiroko Koshino: A Touch of BAUHAUS.

A Touch of BAUHAUS, curated by Kyoko Sato, is part of the WhiteBox Prime SAS (Seminal Artists Series), which honors artists of great repute. Past participants of the WhiteBox Prime SAS include Carolee Schneemann: More Wrong Things, Michael Snow: Snow Alert, Naoto Nagakawa: XXX-1960’s, Vienna Actionists Hermann Nitsch and Günther Brus, Hyman Bloom, Braco Dimitrijevic and Aldo Tambellini to name a few.

Post-World War II Japan found itself in the midst of rapid economic and cultural transformation – one in which growing industries such as technology and fashion shot to the forefront. It was amidst this landscape that a group of young people began rebelling by sporting a preppy, Ivy League look that broke stride with propriety-and time-honored traditions, and celebrated individualism. Known as the “Miyuki Tribe”, with Hiroko Koshino at the helm, talented young fashionistas began reinterpreting traditional Japanese artistic elements through a personalized and radical lens.

Visual artists began to be influenced by various new incoming art notions culled from Abstract Expressionism and Land Art, paralleled by the indigenous and subversive Gutai movement. This fresh shift in artistic perspectives made way for a wave of artistic leaders that included Hiroko Koshino. Building on her belief in the unity of all forms of art-a Bauhaus tenet- the classically trained Koshino used key elements to inform her paintings and sumi-ink masterworks as the basis for her stunning fashion designs, resulting in her recognition as one of the foremost couturiers in Japan.

HIROKO KOSHINO: A Touch of BAUHAUS will, for the first time in New York, reveal how Koshino’s visual artworks inform her high fashion designs. Curated by Kyoko Sato at WhiteBox, the exhibition will include Koshino’s most inventive runway pieces, side-by-side with her signature abstract paintings and sumi-ink works, including-in WhiteBox’s project space-a site-specific eighty-foot-long ink scroll that epitomizes her brilliant combination of art and design as Gesamtkunstwerk, the Bauhaus approach towards a total artwork.

After years of creating riveting artworks inspired by key painters ranging from Jackson Pollock to Gustav Klimt, as well as the Lyrical Abstraction and Tachism movements, Koshino began experimenting with the connection between art and fashion in the serene studio created for her by her colleague, genius architect Tadao Ando, in Ashiya. There she was able to deeply connect with her love for Mother Nature, free from the hustle and bustle demands of Tokyo, while infusing her paintings with a deeply Japanese attitude.

Koshino’s innovative design techniques, based on painting with sumi-ink directly onto the fabric, were the essence of many of her innovative fashion creations. In an essay on Koshino and her works, critic Anthony Haden-Guest writes, “Hiroko’s Sumi-Ink works are wholly beautiful, but not so much so as to overwhelm. They do not exclude, they embrace.”

Early in the history of Japanese art, Nihonga, tradition-based Japanese paintings, used to be exhibited in separate spaces from yōga, or artwork with Western influences. A push for change and a reconciliation of the two energies was beginning to happen. Thus Haden-Guest points out that while Hiroko’s work is “delicate, forceful and remarkably various … it embodies this accommodation, in her fashion, as in her art,” fusing the two styles.

In 1977, Hiroko joined the cutting-edge group “TD6” (Top Designers 6), presenting her fashion collection in Tokyo for the first time. Since, she has been showcasing twice a year. In 1978, she became the first Japanese designer to join Alta Moda in Rome, a sensational show earning her a thirty-page article in the Italian edition of Harper’s Bazaar.

In 1982 Hiroko Koshino created International Inc., leading the “Designer’s Character Brand” boom that turned fashion into a top industry in Japan. Subsequently, she debuted her brand and her signature prêt-à-porter collection at the Paris Fashion Week, to great acclaim.

Koshino considers herself an artist since childhood. She got started drawing characters from Manga and Anime, attending Kabuki plays regularly, influenced as well by the Bunraku national puppet theater of Japan. Six decades later, Koshino unabashedly continues her painting career, having created, by now, well over 1,900 paintings using a wide variety of techniques and inventive, unorthodox paint applications.

Her artwork continues as a wellspring of inspiration flowing right into her fashion design. “I can continue designing because I paint,” Koshino explains. Indeed, her paintings frequently function as brainstorm-drafts for what will later become one of the extraordinary design creations that she refers to as “the architecture of the body”, all along carrying as part of her signature, the elemental Japanese sense of sculptural ‘high volume’ in her couture.

Although her artwork and design are deeply intertwined, Koshino explains there is a definite separation between the two camps. “The process of production in fashion and art is very different,” she says. “When I make art, I can express my spirit directly. It is very personal. When I create fashion, I need to think about what people want, and I need to design what people will buy, so it unequivocally contains a business aspect.”

Kyoko Sato 

Koshino’s works will be showcased at WhiteBox with an opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on November 1st. The exhibition runs through December 1st.

“I can continue designing because I paint,” Koshino says. “Both design and art are my creation, and I cannot divide them.” This thought reminds people of Bauhaus-style “total work of art” (Gesamtkunstwerk), which became the title of her New York debut exhibition at the WhiteBox [HIROKO KOSHINO: A TOUCH OF BAUHAUS (329 Broome Street); Curator Kyoko Sato (Nov. 1-Dec. 1, 2018)]

FASHION INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LECTURE BY HIROKO KOSHINO

Thursday, November 1, 2018 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Fashion Institute of Technology
227 W 27th St, New York, NY 10001
Feldman C501

About WhiteBox:
WhiteBox, on its 20th anniversary remains a non-profit art space aiming for total invention catalyzing the tenor of the times. It serves as a platform for contemporary artists to develop and showcase new sitespecific work, and is a laboratory for unique commissions, exhibitions, special events, roundtables, and arts education programs, providing an opportunity to experience an artist’s practice in a meaningful way, socially inspired free from market constraints. WhiteBox artistic vision provides hard to pigeon-hole artists with sustained exposure, creating an ideal environment for more in-depth interaction between sophisticated as well as community-bound New York audiences and artists’ practices. It achieves this by inviting local and international emerging and established artists to respond to its exhibition space with leading-edge interventions, performances, and developing long-term inspired programming that allows them to develop projects and engage with audiences. The artists who exhibited at WhiteBox tend to defy easy categorization.

Special thanks to The Costume Institute, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and Nao Takekoshi.

CAMP IN FASHION – COSTUME INSTITUTE’S SPRING 2019 EXHIBITION AND MET GALA

(New York, October 9, 2018)—The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced today that The Costume Institute’s Spring 2019 exhibition will be Camp: Notes on Fashion, on view from May 9 through September 8, 2019 (preceded on May 6 by The Costume Institute Benefit). Presented in The Met Fifth Avenue’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, it will explore the origins of the camp aesthetic and how it has evolved from a place of marginality to become an important influence on mainstream culture. Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay Notes on ‘Camp’ provides the framework for the exhibition, which will examine how fashion designers have used their métier as a vehicle to engage with camp in a myriad of compelling, humorous, and sometimes incongruous ways.

“Camp’s disruptive nature and subversion of modern aesthetic values has often been trivialized, but this exhibition will reveal its profound influence on both high art and popular culture,” said Max Hollein, Director of The Met. “By tracing its evolution and highlighting its defining elements, the show will embody the ironic sensibilities of this audacious style, challenge conventional understandings of beauty and taste, and establish the critical role this important genre has played in the history of art and fashion.”

In celebration of the opening, The Costume Institute Benefit, also known as The Met Gala, will take place on Monday, May 6, 2019. The evening’s co-chairs will be Lady Gaga, Alessandro Michele, Harry Styles, Serena Williams, and Anna Wintour. The event is The Costume Institute’s main source of annual funding for exhibitions, publications, acquisitions, and capital improvements.

“Fashion is the most overt and enduring conduit of the camp aesthetic,” said Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute. “Effectively illustrating Sontag’s Notes on ‘Camp,’ the exhibition will advance creative and critical dialogue about the ongoing and ever-evolving impact of camp on fashion.”

The exhibition will feature approximately 175 objects, including womenswear and menswear, as well as sculptures, paintings, and drawings dating from the 17th century to the present. The show’s opening section will position Versailles as a “camp Eden” and address the concept of se camper—”to posture boldly”—in the royal courts of Louis XIV and Louis XV. It will then focus on the figure of the dandy as a “camp ideal” and trace camp’s origins to the queer subcultures of Europe and America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In her essay, Sontag defined camp as an aesthetic and outlined its primary characteristics. The largest section of the exhibition will be devoted to how these elements-which include irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration-are expressed in fashion.

Designers whose works will be featured in the exhibition include Gilbert Adrian, Cristóbal Balenciaga, Thom Browne, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, John Galliano (for Martin Margiela, House of Dior, and his own label), Jean Paul Gaultier, Rudi Gernreich, Guccio Gucci, Demna Gvasalia (for Balenciaga and his own label), Marc Jacobs (for Louis Vuitton and his own label), Charles James, Stephen Jones, Christian Lacroix, Karl Lagerfeld (for House of Chanel, Chloe, and his own label), Herbert and Beth Levine, Alessandro Michele (for Gucci), Franco Moschino, Thierry Mugler, Norman Norell, Marjan Pejoski, Paul Poiret, Miuccia Prada, Richard Quinn, Christian Francis Roth, Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli, Jeremy Scott (for Moschino and his own label), Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren (for Viktor & Rolf), Anna Sui, Philip Treacy, Walter Van Beirendonck, Donatella Versace (for Versace), Gianni Versace, Vivienne Westwood, and Charles Frederick Worth.

The exhibition is organized by Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, with Karen Van Godtsenhoven, Associate Curator. Theater scenographer Jan Versweyveld, whose work includes Lazarus with David Bowie as well as Broadway productions of A View from the Bridge and The Crucible, will create the exhibition design with The Met’s Design Department. Select mannequin headpieces will be created by Shay Ashual. Raul Avila will produce the gala décor, which he has done since 2007.

A publication by Andrew Bolton with Fabio Cleto, Karen van Godtsenhoven, and Amanda Garfinkel will accompany the exhibition and include new photography by Johnny Dufort. It will be published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and distributed by Yale University Press.

The exhibition is made possible by Gucci.

Additional support is provided by Condé Nast.