RICHARD AVEDON: NOTHING PERSONAL

 New York—Pace Gallery and Pace/MacGill Gallery are honored to announce their representation of The Richard Avedon Foundation with an exhibition of Richard Avedon’s photographs and extensive archival materials drawn from Nothing Personal, Avedon’s 1964 collaboration with James Baldwin. This will be the first comprehensive presentation of this period of Avedon’s work and will be on view at 537 West 24th Street from November 17, 2017 through January 13, 2018. To coincide with the occasion, TASCHEN will republish a facsimile edition of Nothing Personal with an accompanying booklet containing a new introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Hilton Als and rare and unpublished Avedon photographs.Native New Yorkers Richard Avedon (1923-2004) and James Baldwin (1924-1987) met as students at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx in the late 1930s. They became friends while writing for and editing The Magpie, the school’s literary magazine. Even as teenagers, they, in their writing, dealt with profound issues of race, mortality, and, as Avedon wrote, “the future of humanity” as World War II closed in on them.

George Wallace, Governor of Alabama, November 1963 Photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation

In January of 1963, Avedon photographed Baldwin for a magazine assignment and suggested that they work on a book about life in America. Baldwin readily agreed. “This book,” said Baldwin at the time, “examines some national and contemporary phenomena in an attempt to discover why we live the way we do. We are afflicted by an ignorance of our natures vaster and more dangerous than our ignorance of life on Mars.”

Corresponding frequently with Baldwin, Avedon traveled extensively in 1963 and 1964 photographing portraits for the book while Baldwin wrote the essay. They met up periodically to share and discuss their progress. The collaboration resulted in some of Avedon’s most pivotal portraiture of his middle career, from civil rights icons (Malcolm X) to staunch segregationists (George Wallace); to aging stars (Joe Louis) and young fame seekers (Fabian); to powerful politicians (Adam Clayton Powell) and ordinary citizens; to young idealists (Julian Bond) and elderly pacifists (Norman Thomas); to patients committed to a mental institution who seek love, comfort, and some semblance of consideration.

At the core of the photographs – almost all of which will be on view at Pace Gallery – is the question of how Americans understand race relations and their own identities, and, by extension, the identities and civil rights of others.

“Both Avedon and Baldwin cared deeply about what was (or was not) going on in America in the early 1960s. It was an explosive time, not unlike the one we live in today. The events enveloping our country provoked Avedon’s careful reflection and examination of the place and its people. There is a lot to learn from looking at this prophetic work and considering the very profound statement it makes.”—Peter MacGill

Marilyn Monroe, actress, May 1957 Photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation

Nothing Personal was originally designed by Marvin Israel and published by Atheneum in November of 1964 under the aegis of legendary editor Simon Michael Bessie. Though denounced at the time of publication, Nothing Personal is now recognized as a masterwork whose powerful message of a confused and often compromised society seeking fleeting moments of joy, grace and occasional redemption remains equally relevant more than a half-century later.

Richard Avedon (1932–was born in New York City in 1923 and joined the Young Men’s Hebrew Association camera club at the age of 12. After serving as a Photographer’s Mate Second Class in the U.S. Merchant Marine during World War II, he began working as a freelance photographer, primarily for Harper’s Bazaar, in 1944. Under the tutelage of Alexey Brodovitch, Avedon quickly became the magazine’s lead photographer, while also creating formal portraits for many other sources, including his own portfolio.

First showcased in Edward Steichen’s Family of Man exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art in 1955, Avedon’s work has appeared in numerous exhibitions worldwide. His first retrospective was held at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington,

D.C. in 1962 and was followed by solo exhibitions at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (1970), The Museum of Modern Art, New York (1974), the Amon Carter Museum of American Art (1985), and the Whitney Museum of American Art (1994), among others. Avedon was the first living photographer to receive two shows at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (1978 and 2002).

Avedon died while working on an assignment called “Democracy” for The New Yorker during the 2004 presidential election. During his lifetime, he established The Richard Avedon Foundation in New York City, which now houses his archive and works with curators and collectors around the world.

Patients in a mental institution, February 1963 Photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation

Pace/MacGill, one of the world’s leading photography galleries has been dedicated to advancing fine art photography for over 30 years. Known for discovering artists, representinv masters, and placing important collections and archives into major public institutions, Pace/MacGill has presented some 200 exhibitions and published numerous catalogues on modern and contemporary photography. Founded in 1983 by Peter MacGill, in collaboration with Arne Glimcher of Pace and Richard Solomon of Pace Editions, Pace/MacGill is located at 32 East 57th Street in New York City.

Pace is a leading contemporary art gallery representing many of the most significant international artists and estates of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Founded by Arne Glimcher in Boston in 1960 and currently led by Marc Glimcher, Pace has been a constant, vital force in the art world and has introduced many renowned artists’ work to the public for the first time. Pace has mounted more than 900 exhibitions, including scholarly shows that have subsequently traveled to museums, and published over 450 exhibition catalogues. Today, Pace has nine locations worldwide: three galleries in New York; one in London; one in Palo Alto, California; one in Beijing; and spaces in Hong Kong, Paris, and Seoul. In 2016, the gallery launched Pace Art + Technology, a new program dedicated to showcasing interdisciplinary art groups, collectives and studios whose works explore the confluence of art and technology.

 Members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, March 1963 Photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation

Santa Monica Beach, September 1963 Photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation

William Casby, born in slavery, March 1963 Photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation

DAVID HOCKNEY – THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

For nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges. A major retrospective at The Metropolitan Museum of Art—the show’s only North American venue, opening November 27, 2017—honors the artist in the year of his 80th birthday by presenting his most iconic works and key moments of his career from 1960 to the present. Working in a wide range of media with equal measures of wit and intelligence, Hockney, has examined, probed, and questioned how to capture the perceived world of movement, space, and time in two dimensions. The exhibition David Hockney will offer a grand overview of the artist’s achievements across all media, including painting, drawing, photography, and video. From his early engagement with modernist abstraction and mid-career experiments with illusion and realism, to his most recent, jewel-toned landscapes, Hockney has consistently explored the nature of perception and representation with both intellectual rigor and sheer delight in the act of looking.

Born in West Yorkshire, where he attended the local Bradford School of Art, Hockney moved to London in 1959 to study at the Royal College of Art. His career is distinguished as much by early successes as by his willingness to flaunt conventions both societal and artistic. Hockney’s works from the 1960s brazenly reference homoerotic subject matter, from Walt Whitman to Physique Pictorial muscle magazines, while his dedication to figuration throughout his career runs against the grain of predominant art world trends on both sides of the Atlantic.

Many fine examples of Hockney’s work from California in the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as his double portraits from New York, London, and Los Angeles, show the artist’s interest in the tension that exists in social relationships and the difficulty of depicting transparent material such as glass and water. By the late 1970s and early 1980s, Hockney turned to a brightly hued palette and fractured, cubistic perspective that mirrors both his interest in Pablo Picasso and his own experiments with Polaroid photography. In recent decades, Hockney has ventured outdoors to paint the changeable landscapes of his native Yorkshire across the seasons, while simultaneously returning to the study of figures in social groupings. Keenly interested in scientific innovations in the aid of art, Hockney recently experimented with an old technology: he created a series of portrait drawings using a camera lucida, first employed by artists in the Renaissance to render one-point perspective. He has also always embraced new technologies, including the possibilities for colorful composition offered by applications on the iPhone and iPad. Examples of the artist’s experiments in that medium will be included in the galleries. The exhibition ends with his most recent, near neon-toned landscapes, painted in the last three years in Southern California, where he returned to live in 2013. The Met presentation marks the first time the series will be exhibited publicly in the United States. Even to the most committed follower of Hockney’s art, the unprecedented unification of his renowned early works with the newest, will be revelatory.

David Hockney
Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures)
1972
Acrylic on canvas
The Lewis Collection
© David Hockney, Photo Credit: Art Gallery of New South Wales / Jenni Carter

David Hockney
Large Interior, Los Angeles
1988
Oil, ink on cut-and-pasted paper, on canvas
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Natasha Gelman Gift, in honor of William S. Lieberman, 1989 (1989.279)
© David Hockney

David Hockney
“Garden, 2015”
Acrylic on canvas
48 x 72″
© David Hockney
Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt
David Hockney
Domestic Scene, Los Angeles
1963
Oil on canvas
Private collection
© David Hockney
David Hockney
Colorado River
1998
Oil on canvas
Private collection, courtesy of Richard Gray Gallery
© David Hockney, Photo Credit: Tom Van Eynde
David Hockney
Cleaning Teeth, Early Evening (10 PM) W11
1962
Oil on canvas
Astrup Fearnley Collection, Oslo, Norway
© David Hockney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Hockney
A Bigger Splash
1967
Acrylic on canvas
Tate, purchased 1981
© David Hockney, Photo Credit: ©Tate, London 2017                                                                                                 

Exhibition Dates:
November 27, 2017– February 25, 2018
Exhibition Location:
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Galleries,
Gallery 999


At The Met, David Hockney is curated by Ian Alteveer, Curator, with assistance from Meredith Brown, Research Associate, both in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art.
The exhibition is made possible in part by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Jay Pritzker Foundation, the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund, and the Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed Fund. It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. It is organized collaboratively by Tate Britain, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated, scholarly catalogue published by Tate

ROSSY DE PALMA X M.A.C. COSMETICS

Rossy de Palma’s strikingly unique, Picasso-esque beauty and uninhibited, creative soul has made her one of Spanish art, fashion and cinema’s most original muses and collaborators. Now, her joie de vivre is captured in her M∙A∙C colour collection. Special packaging takes on new meaning with inspiration drawn from Rossy’s romantic glamour, and palettes featuring her eyes, nose and lips come together to form an invincible Cubist vision.

Run to the nearest MAC location near you to grab some of these fabulous and unique products, and be sure to check out our cover feature with the iconic Spanish talent here!

 

THE WEBSTER OPENS ITS NEWEST LOCATION IN NYC

With the store originating from the tropics of South Beach and having expanded to Houston, Costa Mesa, and Bal Harbour—it was only natural for The Webster to house their new location in the heart of New York City’s, Soho. Laure Heriard Dubreuil, founder of the luxury retailer, has mirrored the same opulent brand formula with a new ingredient—Webster Home. The six story building will handle pieces by Italian artist Gaetano Pesce, Pierre Frey fabrics that are exclusive to The Webster, and Nada Debs brass candy colored pebble table. Throughout the renovation of their new location The Webster befriended Maxi Cohen, photographer, video artist, and neighbor whose piece is now featured on the third floor.

The store is thoughtfully filled with French 50’s sconce lights and wall papers from the 20’s and 30’s and does the historical 1878, 12,000-square-foot building proud. Turn of the century light wells guide you onto a vintage loading dock entrance, and step out into a room that’s a fusion of new and retrograded pieces mirroring the original Webster store, which was redeveloped with the help and design of Christopher Osvai.

Filling the six floored location are thirty male designers and 68 women designers, including but not limited to Isa Arfen, Julien David, and jewelry by Anita Ko, The Webster combines high end clothing interwoven amongst art deco and one of a kind installations. Sculptures such as Aaron Young’s “Below the Underdog, 2010” is set amongst thoughtfully chosen menswear on the fourth floor.

For more information about the founder, Laure Heriard Dubreuil, check out her Iris Woman feature!

All photos by Andrew Rowat courtesy of Karla Otto Public Relations

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster, located at 29 Greene Street, opened to the public Monday, November 6, 2017

Shop online here

HEAVENLY BODIES: FASHION AND THE CATHOLIC IMAGINATION

Costume Institute Benefit on May 7 with Co-Chairs Amal Clooney, Rihanna, Donatella Versace, and Anna Wintour, and Honorary Chairs Christine and Stephen A. Schwarzman

(New York, November 8, 2017)—The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced today that The Costume Institute’s spring 2018 exhibition will be Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, on view from May 10 through October 8, 2018 (preceded on May 7 by The Costume Institute Benefit). Presented at The Met Fifth Avenue in both the medieval galleries and the Anna Wintour Costume Center, the show will also occupy The Met Cloisters, creating a trio of distinct gallery locations. The thematic exhibition will feature a dialogue between fashion and masterworks of religious art in The Met collection to examine fashion’s ongoing engagement with the devotional practices and traditions of Catholicism. A group of papal robes and accessories from the Vatican will travel to the United States to serve as the cornerstone of the exhibition, highlighting the enduring influence of liturgical vestments on designers.

“The Catholic imagination is rooted in and sustained by artistic practice, and fashion’s embrace of sacred images, objects, and customs continues the ever-evolving relationship between art and religion,” said Daniel H. Weiss, President and CEO of The Met. “The Museum’s collection of religious art, in combination with the architecture of the medieval galleries and The Cloisters, provides the perfect context for these remarkable fashions.”

In celebration of the opening, the Museum’s Costume Institute Benefit, also known as The Met Gala, will take place on Monday, May 7, 2018. The evening’s co-chairs will be Amal Clooney, Rihanna, Donatella Versace, and Anna Wintour. Christine and Stephen A. Schwarzman will serve as Honorary Chairs. The event is The Costume Institute’s main source of annual funding for exhibitions, publications, acquisitions, and capital improvements.

“Fashion and religion have long been intertwined, mutually inspiring and informing one another,” said Andrew Bolton, Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute. “Although this relationship has been complex and sometimes contested, it has produced some of the most inventive and innovative creations in the history of fashion.”

Exhibition Overview
The exhibition will feature approximately 50 ecclesiastical masterworks from the Sistine Chapel sacristy, many of which have never been seen outside the Vatican. These will be on view in the Anna Wintour Costume Center galleries and will include papal vestments and accessories, such as rings and tiaras, from the 18th to the early 21st century, encompassing more than 15 papacies. The last time the Vatican sent a loan of this magnitude to The Met was in 1983, for The Vatican Collections exhibition, which is the Museum’s third most-visited show.

In addition, approximately 150 ensembles, primarily womenswear, from the early 20th century to the present will be shown in the medieval galleries and The Met Cloisters alongside religious art from The Met collection, providing an interpretative context for fashion’s engagement with Catholicism. The presentation situates these designs within the broader context of religious artistic production to analyze their connection to the historiography of material Christianity and their contribution to the perceptual construction of the Catholic imagination.

Designers in the exhibition will include Azzedine Alaïa, Cristobal Balenciaga, Geoffrey Beene, Marc Bohan (for House of Dior), Thom Browne, Roberto Capucci, Callot Soeurs, Jean Charles de Castelbajac, Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel, Maria Grazia Chiuri (for House of Dior), Domenico Dolce & Stefano Gabbana (for Dolce & Gabbana), John Galliano (for House of Dior), Jean Paul Gaultier, Givenchy, Craig Green, Madame Grès (Alix Barton), Rei Kawakubo (for Comme des Garçons), Christian Lacroix, Karl Lagerfeld (for House of Chanel), Jeanne Lanvin, Shaun Leane, Claire McCardell, Laura and Kate Mulleavy (for Rodarte), Thierry Mugler, Norman Norell, Guo Pei, Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli (for Valentino), Pierpaolo Piccioli (for Valentino), Elsa Schiaparelli, Raf Simons (for his own label and House of Dior), Riccardo Tisci (for Givenchy), Jun Takahashi (for Undercover), Isabel Toledo, Philip Treacy, Donatella Versace (for Versace), Gianni Versace, Valentina, A.F. Vandevorst, Madeleine Vionnet, and Vivienne Westwood.

Exhibition Credits
The exhibition—a collaboration between The Costume Institute and the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters—is organized by Andrew Bolton, Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, working together with colleagues in The Met’s Medieval department: C. Griffith Mann, Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge of the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters; Barbara Drake Boehm, Paul and Jill Ruddock Senior Curator for The Met Cloisters; Helen C. Evans, Mary and Michael Jaharis Curator of Byzantine Art; and Melanie Holcomb, Curator.

Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R), the interdisciplinary architecture and design firm, will create the exhibition design with The Met’s Design Department. Raul Avila will produce the gala décor, which he has done since 2007.

Related Content
A publication by Andrew Bolton will accompany the exhibition and will include texts by authors David Morgan and David Tracy in addition to new photography by Katerina Jebb. It will be published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and distributed by Yale University Press.

A special feature on the Museum’s website, www.metmuseum.org/HeavenlyBodies, provides further information about the exhibition.

The exhibition is made possible by Christine and Stephen A. Schwarzman, and Versace. Additional support is provided by Condé Nast.

HARRY STYLES RELEASES NEW SINGLE “KIWI”

Harry Styles has released the music video for his new single “Kiwi.” Directed by acclaimed duo Us (Chris Barrett and Luke Taylor), the video was shot in the UK and features young breakout actress Beau Gadsdon (Rogue One: A Star Wars Story).

Harry Styles released his first piece of solo music with his self-titled debut album Harry Styles in May 2017. The 10-track album features the platinum single “Sign of the Times,” and current single “Kiwi.” The album made history in the U.S. with the biggest debut sales week for a U.K. male artist’s first full-length album since Nielsen Music began tracking sales in 1991, topping official charts at #1 in more than 55 countries. Following the album’s release, Styles made his acting debut in Christopher Nolan’s critically acclaimed film “Dunkirk” in July 2017. “Dunkirk” topped the US box office in its first weekend and was one of the top grossing films of the summerrounding off an incredible year for Styles as the first British artist with a #1 debut single, album and film in the same year. Styles is currently on his sold-out Fall 2017 world tour, Harry Styles Live on Tour, which kicked off with intimate venues and will expand to arenas in 2018.
 
For more information, visit: http://hstyles.co.uk/

HARRY STYLES SHARES LIVE PERFORMANCE VIDEO FOR NEW SINGLE “TWO GHOSTS”

Harry Styles shares a live performance video for his new single “Two Ghosts” 

The clip first premiered as part of “Harry Styles: Behind the Album,” a documentary film by production company Fullwell 73 that was released only on Apple Music. The documentary chronicles Harry’s musical journey while creating his much anticipated debut solo album, features exclusive interviews and behind the scenes footage, and is complemented by Harry and his band performing songs from it for the first time at the world famous Abbey Road Studios in London.


“Two Ghosts” is one of 10 performances to be included on the forthcoming “Behind The Album: The Performances” film. Coming soon. Only on Apple Music.


The first leg of
Harry Styles Live On Tour, which sold out in record time, will kick off next month visiting intimate venues around the world and will feature support from MUNA. The tour will expand to arenas in 2018.

 

The Atelier with Alina Cho: PROENZA SCHOULER

The next Atelier with Alina Cho will feature designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler, on Thursday, October 12, at 7:00 p.m. at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. American design talent standouts, Jack and Lazaro rocked the fashion boat in July with their journey across the Atlantic to show their Spring/Summer 2018 ready-to-wear collection during the Fall/Winter 2017 haute couture shows in Paris. Pioneers of style and craft since they launched their brand 15 years ago, the fathers of the 10-year-old perennial “It Bag” known as PS1, will chat with journalist Alina Cho about why they showed in Paris, how they manage their personal and professional relationship, and what inspires their collections.

Now in its fourth season, The Atelier with Alina Cho has featured fashion visionaries such as Alber Elbaz, Diane von Furstenberg, Michael Kors, Olivier Rousteing, Donatella Versace, Alexander Wang, and Anna Wintour in conversations that explore the intersection of fashion and art along with a range of personal topics.

This series is made possible by the Doris & Stanley Tananbaum Foundation in memory of Doris Tananbaum. Proenza Schouler is a New York-based womenswear and accessories brand founded in 2002 by designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez while they were students at Parsons School of Design. Known for drawing inspiration from contemporary art and youth culture, Proenza Schouler has played an important role in reinvigorating American fashion. Named after the designers’ mothers, using their maiden names, Proenza Schouler won the inaugural CFDA Vogue Fashion Fund Award and has won five CFDA awards including Womenswear Designer of the Year and Accessory Designer of the Year. The brand has six freestanding stores, the first of which opened in New York City in 2012, and is sold in more than 350 stores worldwide.

Alina Cho is currently Editor-at-Large at Ballantine Bantam Dell, responsible for acquiring and co-editing books in the fashion and lifestyle categories. She was previously National Correspondent at CNN and host of Fashion: Backstage Pass.

Tickets start at $40. Premium seating is available.
For tickets and information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets or call 212-570-3949. 
Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Monday–Saturday, 11 a.m. –3:30 p.m.
Tickets include Museum admission on the day of the event.
Prices are subject to change.  

GUCCI AND BEYOND

“Gucci and Beyond”, the tagline of Gucci’s new Winter collection, is an apt description of a collection that serves as a love letter to the science fiction shows of the 50’s and 60’s. The most recent collection announcement video pays homage to Star Trek, Star Wars, The Creature from the Black Lagoon and other iconic science fiction hits. The video itself is a love letter to the show, from the classic funk/orchestral score, to the Star Trek set-pieces and stop-motion dinosaur, all of which led to the original shows being loved by so many.

While the video borrows from other series, Star Trek serves as the focal point. The spandex jumpsuits, metallic accessories, and the iconic double-knit sweaters that made the costumes of the show unique and trendsetting, are updated and modified into Gucci’s vision.  

 

However, the video is not the only 60’s sci-fi inspired-content that Gucci is producing. Alessandro Michele is venturing into the extraterrestrial with bright colors, vibrant patterns, and eye-catching pieces. The teaser interviews posted to Gucci’s instagram features modelesque “aliens” with metallic skin, pointed ears, and makeup reminiscent of the otherworldly species of Star Trek. These characters are also featured in the official announcement video, donning the incredible pieces of the newest collection. Among the classic motifs of Gucci are colorful dresses, patterned sweaters, and floral overcoats that are clearly inspired by the color schemes of Star Trek. The red suit featured in the video is a modern update on the classic red sweater that is worn by Captain Picard, and the heavy use of reflective beads and crystals on many of the dresses featured in the video are reminiscent of the sparkling effects used in Star Trek when the characters are transported to the back to the USS Enterprise.

 

The concept of space travel and sci-fi is particularly relevant today, as we are living in a, somewhat more boring and perverted, version of the future that these shows have predicted. What was originally invented by the directors of the time as postulations of the futuristic societies, as well as ways to escape the realities of post-war America, Nixon, Vietnam, etc., is now our reality. Other designers, such as Raf Simons and Saint Laurent, are attempting to not only channel and draw inspiration from the futures of the science fiction genre, but use their collections to push the boundaries of what we think is an ideal future. While other companies, like Saint Laurent, choose to channel more dystopian futures with dark colors, hard lines, and slim tailoring, Gucci has created its own future with this collection. The feelings invoked by the announcement video stand in contrast to the stark and potentially scary realities of Saint Laurent and Raf Simons, opting for a fun and whimsical view of the future. We’d love to see a future collaboration between Gucci and Mars One, ensuring Earth’s dominance over extraterrestrial fashion as we venture into the cosmos.

 

Article by Sol Thompson and Benjamin Price 

All Images Courtesy of Gucci’s Instagram @Gucci 

 

SUPREME X LOUIS VUITTON

Supreme has emerged as a player in the world of high fashion. The evolution from a skateboarding supply store in 1994 to an internationally recognized streetwear powerhouse, Supreme has constantly impressed and acted as a pioneer in the fashion industry. The cult-like following often elects to pay double or triple the retail price of the clothes in order to attain the highly coveted pieces via resale sites, such as eBay or Grailed. With its most recent collaboration, Supreme has elected to once again push its limits and enter the world of high fashion. The new collaboration with Parisian fashion titan Louis Vuitton features bags, jackets, scarves, tees, and accessories.

THEM PANTS AINT EVEN COMING OUT THO

A post shared by PRETTY FLACKO (@asaprocky) on

A$AP Rocky models the unreleased Supreme X Louis Vuitton monogram logo pants.

Louis Vuitton and Supreme have shared history dating back to 2000, when Louis Vuitton sued the NY streetwear brand for mimicking its iconic monogram design on their skateboard decks. Despite their tumultuous introduction, the collaboration has managed to meld two seemingly polarized audiences into a cult following. Similarly, brands such as Vetements have sold collaborations with Champion, as well as many other seemingly incongruous brands, by taking the norm and making it into a luxury artifact. In this recent collaboration, pieces such as the Red Louis Vuitton trunks outfitted with the famous Supreme box logo, the monogrammed denim jackets, and the infamous Supreme/Louis Vuitton box logo tee have come under fire for their high prices, but said high prices don’t seem to deter the fans. In fact, the luxury price point and limited quantity inspire even more frenzied competition.  

@louisvuitton ON GO

A post shared by flame (@travisscott) on

Travis Scott wearing the coveted Supreme X Louis Vuitton box logo tee and sunglasses.

The pop-up shops, located in Seoul, Tokyo, Beijing, Paris, London, Miami, Houston, and Los Angeles, generated colossal lines within hours of their announcement. These pop-up shops are the first opportunity that the public has to purchase items from this collection, and fans are determined to be a part of the historic collaboration. However, Louis Vuitton has stated that the release will be extremely limited, indicating that the fervor is not for naught. The mania has caused streets to shut down, and police intervention has been necessary in order to keep streets and sidewalks clear. Supreme has proven that it is able to thrive in the ever-changing world of fashion, and cement itself as a heavyweight contender in the luxury and streetwear worlds today.

Supreme®/Louis Vuitton® Fall 2017. For more info go to louisvuitton.com #LVxSupreme

A post shared by Supreme (@supremenewyork) on

Supreme shows off their spin on their classic bomber jacket

CONFIRMED POP-UP STORE LOCATIONS/DATES

LA

833 E 3rd St

PARIS

4 Rue du Pont Neuf.

BEIJING

北京 798

LONDON

180 The Strand

SYDNEY

95 Roscoe Street

Bondi Beach, NSW 2026

TOKYO

C-1, 5-3-18

Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku

June 30 – July 13, 2017

Monday to Sunday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. local time

Thursday 10 a.m.-7 p.m.

 

Article by Sol Thompson | Featured Photo Courtesy of © Supreme NYC via supremenyc.com