GOODBYE HORSES

On Nadia – Jacket by DSquared2, Shirt by Land of Distraction, Dress and Shoes by Prada, Leggings by Puma

On Jonny – Coat by Prada, Shirt by Adidas x Alexander Wang available at East Dane, Pants by Versace, Boots by DSquared2

Photographer: Menelik Puryear @mr_puryear
Stylist: Nicholas Whitehouse‭ @nicholas_whitehouse
Hair: Mark Alan @mark.alan.hair
‭Casting: Eric Cano @cano_castings
Horse trainer Melanie Lorek
Models:
Shot at Knoll Farm

On Nadia – Vest by Prada, Shirt and Pants by Land of Distraction, Shoes and Earrings by DSquared2

On Jonny – Jacket by Versace, Yellow Hoodie and pants by Tom Ford

Sweatshirt by Private Policy, Boots by DSquared2

On Valentine – Blazer and Pants by Gucci, Windbreaker by MSGM available at East Dane, Shoes by Y-3, Hat by JJ Hat Center

Jacket by Lacoste, Hat by JJ Hat Center

Shirt by DSquared2, Sunglasses by Miu Miu

Jacket by DSquared2, Long Jacket by Public School, Shorts by Prada, Leggings by Asics

Jacket by Lacoste

On Valentine – Vest by Prada, Pants by Adidas x Alexander Wang, Jeans by MSGM, Shoes by DSquared2, Sweater by Z Zegna

On Jonny – Pants by Z Zegna, Sneakers by Adidas x Raf Simons, Vest by Vintage Martin Margiela, Jacket by Vintage Nike

Dress by Bottega Veneta, Sports Bra by Nike, Sunglasses by Miu Miu

On Valentine, Jacket by DSquared2, Long Jacket by Public School available at East Dane, Shorts by Prada, Leggings by  Asics, Socks and Shoes by Prada

On Nadia – Coat by Off-White, Bodysuit Stylists Own, Earrings by DSquared2, Shoes by Y-3

Jacket by Lacoste, Skirt and Belt by Versace, Socks by Prada

On Valentine – Shirt by Stella McCartney, Coat by Z Zegna, On Nadia – Shirt by Versace, Hat by Prada, On Jonny – Shirt by Prada, Jacket by Adidas x Alexander Wang, Mesh Shirt is Vintage Helmut Lang, Pants by DSquared2

PRIVATE PLACE

Left pearl earring: Ana Khouri | Left gold ear cuff:  Jennifer Fisher | Right gold ear cuff: Ana Khouri | Pearl ring: Ana Khouri | Flower ring and necklace:  Versace | Lingerie:  Agent Provocateur

The line between IRL and online has quickly become indecipherable through our interaction with social media platforms. In our desperation for clout to garner an audience, clicks, likes, or hits as well as the all-too-real insecurity of fomo, we’ve become quick to expose ourselves (or a version of ourselves) online. Corporations, government agencies, and hackers all know us better than we know ourselves. Yet this disconcerting fact seems to render us unphased. We leave ourselves vulnerable and unarmed online. 

In the real life scenario of this, many are only comfortable exposing themselves if they work in a profession that requires publicity. Scopophilia in real life isn’t readily welcomed, especially when we aren’t aware of being watched. Private Place approaches this through the idea of fantasy, using the metaphor of exhibitionism and voyeurism as an illustrative contrast to this vulnerability. The exhibitionist’s strength is that they control just how much they choose to expose themselves to the voyeur, but their power is only as strong as the audience they are able to attract. Here the subject invites an audience to become her voyeur for the emotional release of strength, vulnerability, fear, and power. The idea of privacy invasion becomes inverted and something longed for, much like our attitude has become with online followers.

Photography: Dustin Mansyur @dmansyur | Model: Liz Harlan @f3mm3n1stn1ghtm4r3_ | Styling: Ella Cepeda @ella_cepeda | Beauty and Hair: Agata Helena @agatahelena | Set Design: Dustin Mansyur | Poem and Excerpt Summary: Dustin Mansyur | Digital Tech: Johnny Vicari @johnnyvicari | Video Editor: Ricardo Martinez Roa @ricardomartinezroa

Left pearl earring: Ana Khouri | Left gold ear cuff:  Jennifer Fisher | Right gold ear cuff: Ana Khouri | Pearl ring: Ana Khouri | Flower ring and necklace:  Versace | Lingerie:  Agent Provocateur

Jewelry by Laruicci | Suit by Missoni

Jacket: Erdem | Earrings: Laruicci

Corset: Graham Tyler | Pants: Alexander Wang | Jewelry: Versace | Bracelet: Jennifer Fisher | Shoes: Chloe Gosselin

Top and pants: Alexander Wang | Earrings: Jennifer Fisher

Top: Alexander Wang | Earrings: Jennifer Fisher

Blouse and bag: Versace | Lingerie:  Agent Provocateur | Glasses: Chris Habana | Earrings:  Jennifer Fisher | Shoes: Chloe Gosselin

Blouse and bag: Versace | Lingerie:  Agent Provocateur | Glasses: Chris Habana | Earrings:  Jennifer Fisher | Shoes: Chloe Gosselin

Top: Issey Miyake | Earring: Chris Habana

All Beauty looks created using Mac Cosmetics

CANDY PERFUME GIRL

Jacket by Michael Kors Collection | Earrings by G.Sherman Jewels | Feather Collar by BINCbodyBaubles
Fragrance: LOST CHERRY by Tom Ford

Photography: Katie Borrazzo (@katieborrazzo) | Model: Clare Crawford at IMG Models (@clareacrawford) | Styling: Kingsley Osuji (@kingsley_nyc) | Hair: Erin Taylor (@erintaylorhair) using Wella Stay Firm + Wella Stay Essentiel | Makeup: Megan Kelly (@megankellybeauty) using Mehron | Set Design: Karen DeMaio Weber (@kwyoyo) | Set Assistant: Jana Bergstedt (@janadoesthings)

Dress by Kalmanovich | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise | Socks Stylist’s Own | Shoes by Erdem

Dress by Alena Akhmadullina | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise

Jacket and Shirt by Gucci | Earrings and Ring by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise | Leggings by Alena Akhmadullina | Shoes by Clergerie Paris

Dress by Alena Akhmadullina | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise | Shoes by Marc Jacobs

Dresses, Earrings, Ring, and Shoes by Versace | Socks Stylist’s Own

Jacket and Dress by Tom Ford | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise

Dress by Erdem | Pink Cotton (worn as bow) by Erdem | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise | Bracelet by Marc Jacobs

Top, Bow Collar, Bracelet, Bow Belt, Pants, Socks, Shoes by Marc Jacobs | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise

Dress by Kalmanovich | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise

Dress and Pink Cotton (worn as bow) by Erdem | Earrings by Rainbow Unicorn Birthday Surprise | Bracelet by Marc Jacobs | Socks and Shoes by Erdem

BOUND – MAJORLILKWEEN – EXCLUSIVE MUSIC VIDEO RELEASE

Director: Alexandra Elizabeth (@alexelizabethljadov) | Director of Photography: Samuel Levine (@sammy.august) | VHS: Silver (@silvernyc) | Producer: Julia Banas (@banasjulia) | Art Direction: Julia Banas & Alexandra Elizabeth | Editor: Alexandra Elizabeth & Andy Lincoln (@andyestonia) | Music: Majorlilkween (@majorlilkween) ft. Hadar Adora | Stylist: Liz Rundbaken (@iseelizrund) | Stylist Assistant: Drew Harris (@kingdrewharris) | Make Up: Ayaka Nihei using MAC Cosmetics, @ayaka_nihei | Hair: Takuya Yamaguchi (@tak8133)

Cast: Alexandra Elizabeth (@alexelizabethljadov), Alana Terumi (@meru_turao), Bridget Hearst (@bridgethearst), Danusia G (@beingsilver), Teresa J (@teresacarollynn)

Top, Hat, Skirt, and Shoes: Gucci | Gloves and Socks: Vex | Ring : Laruicci 

Photographer: Enmi Yang (@__enmi) | Stylist: Liz Rundbaken (@iseelizrund) | Stylist Assistant: Drew Harris (@kingdrewharris) | Make Up: Ayaka Nihei using MAC Cosmetics, @ayaka_nihei | Hair: Takuya Yamaguchi (@tak8133)

Models: Alexandra Elizabeth (@alexelizabethljadov), Alana Terumi (@meru_turao), Bridget Hearst (@bridgethearst), Danusia G (@beingsilver), Teresa J (@teresacarollynn)

Jacket and Skirt: MSGM | Top: Alon Livné |Boots: Daniel Silverstain | Top necklace (choker): Laruicci | Bottom Necklace: Stylist’s own

Jacket and Skirt: MSGM | Top: Alon Livné | Boots: Daniel Silverstain | Top necklace (choker): Laruicci | Bottom Necklace: Stylist’s own

Dress: MSGM | Belt: Arthur Arbesser | Gloves: Alon Livné | Top and Socks: Vex | Shoes: Gucci

Sunglasses: Bonnie Clyde | Earrings: Laruicci  |Top: Vex

Suit: Claudia Li | Earrings: Laruicci | Top: Vex | Shoes: HAVVA

Suit: MSGM | Leggings: Versus Versace | Necklace: Laruicci | Bodysuit: This Is a Love Song | Shoes: HAVVA

Bridget–Sunglasses: Westward Leaning | Turtleneck: Arthur Arbesser | Suit: Vintage YSL | Gloves: Alon Livné

Danusia–Hat and Top: Vex | Suit: Topshop | Earrings: Laruicci

Teresa – Jacket, Bralette, and Pants: Milly | Top: Alon Livné | Sunglasses: (no label) Slim Cat EyeRetro Women’s Sunglasses

Danusia – Hat and Bra: Vex | Suit: Topshop | Earrings: Laruicci

Terumi – Suit: Roberto Cavalli | Shirt: Vex | Earrings: Valen & Jette

Bridget – Suit: Topshop | Necklace: Laruicci | Top: Vex | Sunglasses: Bonnie Clyde “Layer Cake”

Terumi – Suit: MSGM | Necklace: Laruicci | Bodysuit: This Is a Love Song

Teresa – Jacket: MSGM | Top: Alon Livné | Skirt: MSGM | Top necklace (choker): Laruicci | Bottom Necklace: Stylist’s own

Teresa – Jacket, Bralette, and Pants: Milly | Top: Alon Livné | Sunglasses: (no label) Slim Cat EyeRetro Women’s Sunglasses

Danusia – Hat and Bra: Vex | Suit: Topshop | Earrings: Laruicci

Terumi – Suit: Roberto Cavalli | Shirt: Vex | Earrings: Valen & Jette

Bridget – Suit: Topshop | Necklace: Laruicci | Top: Vex | Sunglasses: Bonnie Clyde “Layer Cake”

JOEY KING

Dress by Zhivago

Photography by Greg Swales | Styling by Lisa Jarvis | Creative Direction by Louis Liu | Hair by Dimitri Giannetos | Makeup by Jamie Greenberg | Interview by Benjamin Price

Equipped with a dazzling personality, expressive eyes, charming sense of humor, and a girl-next-door smile, it is no wonder that 19 year-old Joey King has found herself to be one of the most promising young actors in Hollywood today. In what stands to be her most emotionally challenging role to date, Joey King has transformed herself into the abused victim-turned-convicted-killer Gypsy Rose Blanchard for Hulu’s new series The Act. Gypsy Rose lived in an environment of abuse, manipulation, dependence, and exploitation at the hands of her mother Dee Dee Blanchard, played by the Academy Award winning actress Patricia Arquette, which Joey King portrays in a shockingly sincere and earnest performance in this disturbing, re-telling of true events.

Joey King’s career and devoted fan following surged after her performance in Netflix’s The Kissing Booth, which was one of the streaming service’s most watched and re-watched films – landing the cast a sequel to be released sometime in 2020. Now, in her new role for Hulu’s latest series The Act, King proves her acting can range from cute, romantic comedy ingenue to psychologically disturbing and multi-dimensional true-crime dramatic starlet.

Taking a break from filming her upcoming productions, Joey King takes the stage as Iris Covet Book’s spring cover. The teenage actress sat down with Iris Covet Book to discuss The Act, the importance of badass women and minorities in Hollywood, and why she would love to direct the next Girl,Interrupted.

 

Dress by Zhivago

Hi Joey!

Hi, how are you?

I’m doing well, thank you – Ok, so let’s jump into this! Can you tell us about your start as an actress at 4 years old? Did you think as a kid that you would be starring in major film and television projects today?

No, definitely not! But it’s interesting because when I started acting, my very first job was actually a LIFE cereal commercial. I thought this was what I was always going to do and had no doubt about that, but I never imagined I would be where I am today. It’s just been an insane journey and opportunity to be where I am, and to meet the people I have met along the way. I have been so incredibly lucky.

That’s a good point. Making the right connections is important in any career – especially as a young actress in the industry I imagine it can be hard to trust everyone.

Exactly! With all of the things that have happened in the past few years with the Times Up Movement and Me Too, I think it’s so exciting to see what new things are happening and how people can feel more safe in the industry. I’ve been in this business for a pretty long time and I feel like I have been pretty lucky to have avoided most of that. I mean of course I have experienced it every now and then, but I know what it looks like, I know how to stay clear, and I haven’t seen a really really dark side as much as other people have. And I feel very lucky for that.

And starting out young would definitely teach you what to avoid later on as you grow and mature by meeting more experienced actors who can show you the lay of the land. And speaking of the Times Up Movement and what’s going on in America at-large, but specifically in Hollywood, what changes have you seen personally in the industry?

I see a lot of inclusiveness and I think it’s beautiful. I just think it’s fucking awesome that more African American people and more Asian people get to tell their stories on-screen more often now, and that’s a new thing to see. I’m really happy that I get to see more of that. It’s great that I am not just being cast to be the daughter anymore, or the little best friend role, and seeing the change in available roles for young women like me is really exciting. I love it so much and I hope we get to continue on this path because things are really starting to change for the better!

It seems to be a really exciting time to be an actor or actress right now. It brings to mind Reese Witherspoon’s production company that works with female-led and female-centric stories, and I wonder if you have any interest in going into writing or producing something like that?

I do! I’m always amazed by writers and directors and how you can come up with a story in your mind and translate it onto paper. I’d love to learn more about the writing process and to direct one day. I feel like now that I am a bit older I have such an interest with what goes on behind the scenes, like I love to hear the Director of Photography talk about the shots, the order of the scenes, and all of those things. I am actually paying attention, and it’s so cool to see how much work and thought goes into making a film or TV show. It’s the coolest thing in the world! I am amazed every day with what they do.

It’s such an exciting time to be listening and aware of all of the different stories out there, especially with social media. You have nearly 9 million Instagram followers and have the ability to tell your story to all those people around the world. How do you feel as an actress and role model to have access to all of your fans directly?

It’s so cool! I get to hear from people every day who look up to me, and I am lucky to have them. My fans are so so sweet, and I am excited that I get to have such direct contact with them. I mean, they are the reason that I am where I am, you know? The Kissing Booth couldn’t have the success that it had without them and some fans watched it over and over again and because of that it became Netflix’s #1 movie in 2018!

 

Dress by Murmur

Dress by Stella McCartney, Jacket by Roberto Cavalli

Paris Hilton said in The American Meme documentary that she loves her fans because she can feel so alone on the road, and doing press, and she feels like her fans are like her family.

Absolutely! I totally agree with that, and I love that she said that. It’s true, like now I am filming in Georgia and working every day, but when I have free time it’s nice to hear from my fans and feel their support through social media.

Yeah absolutely! To pivot the conversation a bit, I really want to hear more about your upcoming role as Gypsy Rose Blanchard on Hulu’s The Act.

Yes! I’ve actually really never been able to transform myself like this before and this is the first time where I can become a different person – a real person! She is alive and in prison as we speak, and the experience has just been incredible! Playing Gypsy was weird…I want to do right by her and I want people to understand her situation, and why she did what she did. Not that what she did was right, but I also don’t think that she deserved to be completely blasted for her thought process. And working with Patricia Arquette is just genuinely the greatest experience of my life.

Were you able to meet Gypsy to prepare for the role or during the process? Does she know about it?

I know that she knows about that show, but I wasn’t able to contact her. I would have loved to get to know more about her as a person, but all I can do is research her story and try to do the best I can and do right by her.

When the story of Gypsy Rose and Dee Dee came out three years ago were you aware of it? Did you watch the HBO documentary?

When I got the call to come in and read for Gypsy I had heard of the story, but I didn’t know a lot and hadn’t seen the documentary. I watched it before the audition and was like, “Are you freaking kidding me??” I went into the audition and was so nervous, but I am so happy that I got to portray her story.

Was there a lot of added pressure playing somebody real? Many actors and actresses have said it can be a bigger challenge.

It is a challenge, and I want people to understand and think about this, and I have conflicting emotions myself over Gypsy. She was raised by a master manipulator and so she kind of became one herself. I understand why a lot of people have a hard time sympathizing with her but I also think this show will hopefully open people’s eyes and show how messed up the conditions really were. It’s a lot of pressure playing a real person, one who is literally just sitting in prison right now, but at the same time I feel really good about it. I hope that I am doing right by her and if she sees it one day she will be like, “Thank God they portrayed me that way!” The series is partially fictional, it is a TV show, but a lot of the shit we are putting in there is true as hell!  

This is one of those stories, like you were saying earlier, that needs to be told. And it’s a story that people can see multiple sides of this very famous, national news story retold in a different way.

Absolutely and there are parts of the show where you will start to feel bad for DeeDee or maybe not like Gypsy very much. The show goes over several years of their life, and you can’t help but go through a lot of emotions while watching it.

It’s real life and there are multiple dimensions and you won’t always like it. I think that’s what is so amazing for actors today because it seems like there are so many dimensional roles for women.

It’s amazing how many female directors we have on the show! It is so awesome getting to work with these super smart women. I have a lot of “firsts” on this show, and these amazing male and female directors made me feel safe to try new, uncomfortable, and weird things.

 

Blouse by Queenie Cao, Pants by Marc Jacobs

Dress and Shoes by Versace

How was the experience as an actress immersing yourself into such a dark space?

It really feels like being born again into this world. I’ve never been able to experience this before, and I am so lucky to have Patricia Arquette by my side every day because she was so supportive, she is so talented, and just a super kind person. And I know being her shooting partner that there are no judgments ever, and I feel like it is honestly so important who you work with because you are in such a vulnerable place as an actor. If you feel judged or feel that the other person is not there for you 100%, then it’s really freaking hard to do your job. She has just been the best partner, and I am so grateful for her, and I am so excited to have everyone see her work on the show. She’s mind-blowing–I mean it’s fucking Patricia Arquette!

Yeah that’s such an amazing opportunity! Have you had any moments while working with her where she has shown you a new layer of the craft?

Definitely! Patricia has definitely shown me a new way of looking at acting. She has such great advice, personally and professionally. She’s just so amazing and I have learned so much from her in the past three months that we have worked together.

That’s fantastic, you are so lucky to have that opportunity.

I know, I can’t believe it! Like every day I’m like, “Oh my god, I get to work again!”

(laughing) That’s great! Are there any other projects that you can hint at in pre-production?

Yes! But…I can’t tell you about any of them. (laughs) I am going to be in Georgia for awhile, and I cannot wait to start doing more press for The Act’s premiere.

What advice would you give another young actress? What would you warn them about?

I would absolutely warn them of people trying to use them or people being friends for the wrong reason, and when you find someone who is there for the right reasons then you have to be sure to hold onto them. Whether it’s a friend, a relationship, a peer, or a mentor, just make sure to hold onto the good people and steer clear of the bullshit! (laughs)

I think that’s good advice for everybody!

I think so too! And it’s so hard to find the right people, but you know I am so lucky to have my family. Not everyone has a strong and supportive family, and if you don’t then you need to surround yourself with really great people and create your own family. It’s going to be hard and it will take awhile, you’re going to cry a few times, but in the end it’ll be worth it!

I love that, that’s good advice! Following-up on our discussion of #TimesUp, minority roles, and the great projects coming out, especially in today’s political climate, is there any movie that you would want to re-tell from your perspective or some story that you would love to produce or direct one day?

Oh my god! That’s such a good question… I don’t know…if I would want to retell a story and direct it myself…the movie I really am thinking about is Girl, Interrupted. I don’t know why that is the first thing that came to mind, but I would love to direct the shit out of that.

Oh my god! Please do that! That’s one of my favorite movies of all time, but I would definitely be very critical of it because it’s just such a fantastic movie.

I would expect nothing but honesty from you! (both laugh) I love that movie so much and I am so happy you love it too. If I were to ever direct something, then that is the first movie to come to mind. I honestly would be open to anything. I have a lot more to learn about this business and a lot more to experience, so I couldn’t tell you exactly what my directorial debut would be just yet!

Well even if it is not Girl, Interrupted, then I think that theme that we have been discussing of women’s stories is so important and telling female-centric, multi-dimensional stories like that would be a great path for you.

I agree with you, that shit’s awesome!

 

Dress by Murmur

Special Thanks to Hammer and Spear in Los Angeles and Larissa Saenz at i-D Public Relations

WEB EXCLUSIVE: SPEED RACER

Top by Linder, Pants stylist own, Necklace by Laruicci, Shoes by Yuulyie

Photography by  Allegra Messina, Model Jieun Hyeon at Supreme, Fashion Styling by Kimberly Nguyen, Prop Styling by Bradley Armstrong, Hair by Jenni Iva Wimmerstedt, Makeup by Michael Chua using MAC Cosmetics

Sweater by Rag and Bone, Skirt by Livné, Gloves by Wing & Weft, Fishnet stockings by We Love Colors

Jacket by Adam Selman, Earrings by Laruicci, Gloves by Wing & Weft

Button-Down Top by Marcelo Burlon

Leather jacket by REDValentino, Top by Tommy Hilfiger, Skirt by Tommy Hilfiger, Boots by REDValentino, Bag by Yuulyie

Top by Maje, Earrings by Laruicci, Skirt by Linder

Top by Versus Versace, Jacket by Versus Versace, Pants by DROMe, Boots by Adam Selman

Jacket by Belstaff, Trouser by Maje

Top by Versus Versace, Jacket by Versus Versace, Gloves by Wing & Weft

T-shirt and Top by Kenzo, Skirt by Kenzo, Gloves by Wing & Weft, Earrings by Lauricci

CAMP IN FASHION – COSTUME INSTITUTE’S SPRING 2019 EXHIBITION AND MET GALA

(New York, October 9, 2018)—The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced today that The Costume Institute’s Spring 2019 exhibition will be Camp: Notes on Fashion, on view from May 9 through September 8, 2019 (preceded on May 6 by The Costume Institute Benefit). Presented in The Met Fifth Avenue’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, it will explore the origins of the camp aesthetic and how it has evolved from a place of marginality to become an important influence on mainstream culture. Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay Notes on ‘Camp’ provides the framework for the exhibition, which will examine how fashion designers have used their métier as a vehicle to engage with camp in a myriad of compelling, humorous, and sometimes incongruous ways.

“Camp’s disruptive nature and subversion of modern aesthetic values has often been trivialized, but this exhibition will reveal its profound influence on both high art and popular culture,” said Max Hollein, Director of The Met. “By tracing its evolution and highlighting its defining elements, the show will embody the ironic sensibilities of this audacious style, challenge conventional understandings of beauty and taste, and establish the critical role this important genre has played in the history of art and fashion.”

In celebration of the opening, The Costume Institute Benefit, also known as The Met Gala, will take place on Monday, May 6, 2019. The evening’s co-chairs will be Lady Gaga, Alessandro Michele, Harry Styles, Serena Williams, and Anna Wintour. The event is The Costume Institute’s main source of annual funding for exhibitions, publications, acquisitions, and capital improvements.

“Fashion is the most overt and enduring conduit of the camp aesthetic,” said Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute. “Effectively illustrating Sontag’s Notes on ‘Camp,’ the exhibition will advance creative and critical dialogue about the ongoing and ever-evolving impact of camp on fashion.”

The exhibition will feature approximately 175 objects, including womenswear and menswear, as well as sculptures, paintings, and drawings dating from the 17th century to the present. The show’s opening section will position Versailles as a “camp Eden” and address the concept of se camper—”to posture boldly”—in the royal courts of Louis XIV and Louis XV. It will then focus on the figure of the dandy as a “camp ideal” and trace camp’s origins to the queer subcultures of Europe and America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In her essay, Sontag defined camp as an aesthetic and outlined its primary characteristics. The largest section of the exhibition will be devoted to how these elements-which include irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration-are expressed in fashion.

Designers whose works will be featured in the exhibition include Gilbert Adrian, Cristóbal Balenciaga, Thom Browne, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, John Galliano (for Martin Margiela, House of Dior, and his own label), Jean Paul Gaultier, Rudi Gernreich, Guccio Gucci, Demna Gvasalia (for Balenciaga and his own label), Marc Jacobs (for Louis Vuitton and his own label), Charles James, Stephen Jones, Christian Lacroix, Karl Lagerfeld (for House of Chanel, Chloe, and his own label), Herbert and Beth Levine, Alessandro Michele (for Gucci), Franco Moschino, Thierry Mugler, Norman Norell, Marjan Pejoski, Paul Poiret, Miuccia Prada, Richard Quinn, Christian Francis Roth, Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli, Jeremy Scott (for Moschino and his own label), Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren (for Viktor & Rolf), Anna Sui, Philip Treacy, Walter Van Beirendonck, Donatella Versace (for Versace), Gianni Versace, Vivienne Westwood, and Charles Frederick Worth.

The exhibition is organized by Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, with Karen Van Godtsenhoven, Associate Curator. Theater scenographer Jan Versweyveld, whose work includes Lazarus with David Bowie as well as Broadway productions of A View from the Bridge and The Crucible, will create the exhibition design with The Met’s Design Department. Select mannequin headpieces will be created by Shay Ashual. Raul Avila will produce the gala décor, which he has done since 2007.

A publication by Andrew Bolton with Fabio Cleto, Karen van Godtsenhoven, and Amanda Garfinkel will accompany the exhibition and include new photography by Johnny Dufort. It will be published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and distributed by Yale University Press.

The exhibition is made possible by Gucci.

Additional support is provided by Condé Nast.

IN THE MOOD

Top: On Trevor–Jacket by Versus Versace, Underwear by Versace, Trousers by Moschino.

Bottom: On Pietro– Underwear by Emporio Armani

Photography by Greg Swales | Styling by Marc Sifuentes | Models.Trevor Signorino @ Next New York, Pietro Baltazar @ Next New York,
Thom Gwin @ Soul Artist Management, Augusta Alexander @ Soul Artist Management, Tomas Skoloudik @ Heroes Models

 

Left: On Thomas– Jacket by Michael Kors and Trousers by Kenzo

Right: On Augusta– Necklaces by Coach 1941

Top Left: On Tomas– Trousers by Philipp Plein, Underwear by Versace.

Top Right: On Pietro– Sweater by Off-White, Underwear by Calvin Klein.

Bottom Left: On Augusta–Shirt by Vivienne Westwood.

Bottom Right: On Tomas–Jacket and Trousers by Coach 1941, Polo Shirt by Calvin Klein

On Augusta– Shirt and Trousers by Versus Versace

Top Left: On Augusta–Shorts by Moschino.

Top Right: On Pietro–Sweater by Off-White, Underwear by Calvin Klein.

Top: On Thom– Jacket and Shirt by Thom Browne.

Bottom Left: On Augusta–Jacket, Necklaces, Trousers and Shoes by Coach 1941, Underwear by Calvin Klein.

Bottom Right: On Pietro– Sweater by Vivienne Westwood, Shorts by Kenzo and Socks by Stance

 

On Tom–Jacket, Shirt, Cumberbun and Trousers by Tom Ford.

Top Right: On Pietro–Tank Top by McQ, Underwear by Calvin Klein, Socks by Stance.

Bottom: On Thomas– Jacket and Trousers by Philipp Plein, Underwear by Versace.

 

Top Left: On Augusta–Tank Top and Speedo by Moschino.

Top Right: On Pietro–Trousers and Shirt by Kenzo.

Bottom: On Pietro– Shirt by COS, Underwear by Emporio Armani.

Groomers: Austin Burns using Oribe (Augusta and Trevor), Gianluca Mandelli using Kerastase (Thom and Tomas), and Wendi Miyake (Pietro) Art Direction by Louis Liu, Editor-in- Chief Marc Sifuentes, Production by Benjamin Price, Stylist Assistant Justin Dahlgren, Production/ Photo Assistant Lavoisier Clemente.

DAYLIGHT DISCO

Dress by Moschino, Earrings by Haus of Topper

Photography by Justin von Oldershausen | Styling by Noah Diaz| Models: Kobe Delgado @ Click, Sasha Komissarov @ IMG, Ange Marie Moutambou @ Heroes, Emely Montero @ Wilhelmina, Anita Terenteva @ Wilhelmina

Coat by No.21, Shoes by Valentino, Earrings by Haus of Topper

Dress by Off-White, Shoes by Versace, Earrings by Laruicci

Suit and Shoes by Kenzo

Top Image: Shirt and Trousers by Versace, Necklace Stylist’s Own
Bottom Image: Dress by Valentino, Shoes by Versace and Earrings by Laruicci

Dress, Tights and Shoes by Versace, Earrings by Laruicci

Hair by Sonny Molina using Davines, Makeup by Yuui using Dior makeup, Photo assistants Matt Lesman and Elizabeth Tan

EXCLUSIVE: ERIKA JAYNE


Photography by Alexandra Gavillet | Styling by Rafael Linares @ Art Department | Interview by Cecily Strong

From dancing on gin-soaked stages in the dive bars of West Hollywood, navigating the many dramas of the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, to being immortally satirized on Saturday Night Live, the reality star, pop culture icon, and now New York Times best-selling author is taking the world by storm.

Erika Jayne is embracing opportunities with open arms, switching at the drop of a hat between author, international performer, “housewife,” and the icon we didn’t even know we needed. The Real Housewives franchises are filled with meme-worthy moments, unforgettable quotes, and exciting drama, but few women from the reality series have become household names to the degree of Erika Girardi, AKA Erika Jayne. In an exclusive interview between Erika and Saturday Night Live’s Cecily Strong, who parodied Jayne on the legendary sketch show and cemented Erika’s status as a cultural touchstone, the two women discuss ageism in the entertainment industry, creating a public persona, and her new Simon & Schuster bestselling book, Pretty Mess.

Jacket by Tom Ford, Earrings by House of Emmanuele

Earrings by House of Emmanuele

Hello! How are you Erika?

Hi Cecily, I am so good—it’s so nice to talk to you.

You too, what a treat! I am such a fan! A real fan, not just an Instagram fan. I am so excited. I’ve been bragging to everyone at SNL about getting to do this interview! So, starting with your new book, how did the idea to publish a memoir take off?

I was approached to do the book and said yes because these days I am just saying yes to everything. Obviously, you see a little bit of it on TV, but sharing 45 minutes of screen time with five other women is difficult. Writing a memoir is a way to give the audience a more in-depth peek into my life.

How open are you in this book and are you nervous about revealing too much?

There’s always the version of the truth which you can never tell or else all of your friends and family will never talk to you again (laughs), and then there is the book that I wrote, and then there is the book that got published – which went through two legal processes. Hopefully it works out well and people like it.

(laughs) What was the most challenging part writing the book?

Well, my mother and I were discussing how my father left when I was nine months old, and then she remarried and divorced again. I feel like I had blocked out that part of my childhood. I went back with her trying to piece it all back together. I was looking at it through 46 year-old eyes and thinking it was basically ten years of bullshit!

Do you think that your childhood experiences are the reason that you have this amazing life and personality and are so fabulous and youthful—or in other words, do you think that you’re basking in the things you didn’t have in your childhood?

I feel like I’m eternally 16. I had a nice car, a hot boyfriend, good grades, was performing all the time, and I looked cute. I don’t know if that’s because of my childhood, but I definitely know that all of that has an effect on you growing up.

Well, I understand feeling like you’re eternally a teenager because I feel like I’m 16 even though I’m like… 34, but have you confronted ageism in your industry? Is it something you even think about? I know I don’t think about it much.

Good, and I’m glad you don’t, and the only time I do is when someone tells me, “Oh, aren’t you a little too old to be doing this?” and I’m like, “No, actually I’m not.” I think that it’s important to keep doing it and keep pushing and dreaming because that’s an old way of thinking that is falling by the wayside as women continue to improve and show how powerful we are. You know, when you’re in your 40’s you’re not dead, you’re not done! I feel the most powerful now. I didn’t feel powerful in my 20’s, I was a ding-dong!

I couldn’t wait to turn 30 because I thought, “Finally, people will take me seriously!” And I can’t imagine someone saying to you that you’re too old, that’s insane to me. I’d be like, “Just watch me perform!”

Thank you! Could you imagine telling a man that? Could you imagine telling a man, “Sir, don’t you think you’re a little too old to be running the company?” It’s not fair for us to get a tap on the shoulder like, “Sit down honey, you’ve had enough fun, you’ve had your day, people don’t find you attractive, you can’t sell anything, and your time is up” No! I’m not going to do that.

Good, me neither. We’re taking a vow! What do you hope that people take away from your book and your personal story?

First off, I want people to laugh and have fun. It’s an easy read and a fun read, and if one person walks away inspired to go to dance class again or back to college or just see that, through this human story, we are all the same. My experience is just this way, but it’s the same bullshit for everybody, so don’t quit. You never know what the future holds.

So let’s talk about your persona Erika Jayne, how she was born and how you found her within yourself?

I was about 35 years old, had been married to Tom for six or seven years, and had been exclusively living his lifestyle. I was going to every event and socializing with a whole new set of very educated, super interesting people. I am glad I did it because it was an invaluable education, but it wasn’t me. I was wealthy and living in a bubble where I would shop, go to the gym, and then go to dinners, but what the fuck was I really doing with myself? I longed to go out, create again, and have my own identity.

I just don’t think that Tom expected the book deal, concerts, or this interview in my future. I don’t think anybody did! I started to create on my own, it was something that I loved, and here we are today. And thank God he has been so supportive. I have learned so much, and I am really grateful because without him I wouldn’t be here at all.

That’s so great, and good for you two! You’re a great example for couples. So, when did you get your big break and what was the beginning of your career as Erika Jayne like?

Well, if you take the Erika Jayne Project, it was very small potatoes. It started at my kitchen table and it was just something that I wanted to do. I created the persona with a friend of mine from high school. He took me to a producer friend of his and we made the Pretty Mess album, and I started to perform because that’s what I really love to do. It was the typical beginning. A few people in some terrible dump, no one paying attention, and just begging to get on stage. I thought to myself, “I don’t have to fucking do this, I’m rich! What the fuck am I doing?” (Cecily laughs) I hate to break it down and sound so rude, but there are a lot of naysayers and rejection. I kept putting one foot in front of the other and building it, and slowly but surely people started to pay more attention and come to my shows. The biggest break into pop culture was definitely being cast in the Real Housewives because it took Erika Jayne out of the clubs and into people’s homes, and she even became a parody on Saturday Night Live! (laughs) But I think the most interesting thing was seeing young women, like high school and college-aged girls tell me how much they love my music and style, and I’m like, “Wow, really? I’m old enough to be your mom.” That acknowledgement makes it all worth it.

 

Jacket by Vitor Zerbinato, Dress by Nookie, Boots by Christian Louboutin, Earrings and Ring by Glynneth B.

Jacket by Vitor Zerbinato

Most of my circle of friends are gay men, and so I’m curious when did your relationship with the gay community start?

Children’s theater! (laughs)

Oh my God! Same for me! I was raised in a theater in Chicago by a group of gay men.

That was where I started! And then I went to a performing arts high school where everyone in dance and theater was gay, even our instructors were gay. They were always a part of my life. These are my people and that’s that.

Right, it’s so true, and it’s so funny that I had a very similar experience. When my parents split up I felt that the gay men of my Chicago theater were raising me while my family was a mess.

And I think that’s a wonderful thing to have and I can’t imagine life without gay people in it. They are my closest confidants.

Now what about drag culture? Has drag had an influence on your life and career?

I mean, just take one look at me! What do you think? (laughs) Of course! I love drag because you get to transform into a superhuman. It’s a true art form that is not for the faint of heart. Your costumes, hair, makeup, the whole look, and your style of drag too! There are so many different styles.

What style would you be?

Hooker drag! I want to be hooker drag (both laugh). Are you kidding? Basically that’s what I already am so why not? Keep it going!

So let’s talk Housewives of Beverly Hills! Obviously I am a huge fan, but how has being on the show changed your life? Cameras catching you crying, drunk…I drink a lot, so I could never do reality TV.

I don’t really like crying on camera because you are embarrassed worldwide, and that sucks. But without that exposure I wouldn’t be talking to Cecily Strong and I wouldn’t have a book out today! See what I’m saying? You have to roll with the punches and make the best of it. At the end of the day, it is reality television and I try to be as authentic as I can and have a good time doing it!

As I say in my book, it’s like professional wrestling. There are heroes, villains, costumes, pyrotechnics, but at the end of the day the injuries are real! It’s like we are participating in this absurd narrative, but these are still my feelings and sometimes they get really hurt.

People are awful! Celebrity in general, people feel like they have some sort of ownership over you, and because you get to do your job they get to hurl insults at you. It seems even worse for people in reality TV because it is your name and your life.

Thank god I am 46 and not 26! I have lived a full life, have a successful marriage, had an unsuccessful marriage, I have an adult child, I can pay the bills. Forget it, if I were a kid and did not know who I was, I may not have made it and I would have been crazy-town. Honestly, I consider myself pretty fucking normal.

I think about that all the time. Like I was crazy enough at 22—

Right! I didn’t need anyone telling me I sucked and was awful and should kill myself. You can imagine how the younger ones feel.

I will say that my favorite piece of advice I’ve ever gotten, and I don’t mean to name drop, but it was from Jim Carey at a host dinner for SNL and he told me “Don’t ever let anyone tell you the narrative of your career.”

He’s right, and thank you for sharing that. I’ll split when I’m ready and I’ll do what I need to do. That’s very well said.

Well, thank you Jim Carey! So, what’s next for you? What do you see in the future?

I am on my way to a book signing in New Jersey which is right across the street from a terrible go-go place I used to go-go in when I was younger.

Wow.

I know, it’s really interesting, Cecily. I’m continuing to create, and there’s going to be more music and more shows, and who knows what’s coming, but I feel like it’s going to be really good.

 

Jacket by The Blonds, Bangles, Cuffs, Earrings and Hat by Glynneth B.

Jumpsuit by Any Old Iron, Shoes by Christian Louboutin

Dress by Gucci

Makeup by Etienne Ortega @ The Only Agency using NARS and KKW Beauty, Hair by Castillo @ Tack Artist Group using Sexy Hair styling products & T3 styling tools, Art Direction Louis Liu, Editor-in-Chief Marc Sifuentes, Photo Assistant Mallory, DP Vanessa Konn, Gaffer Zachary Burnett, Production Assistant Benjamin Price, Produced by XTheStudio.com, Special Thanks to Jack Ketsoyan, Laia and Mikey Minden