CAMP IN FASHION – COSTUME INSTITUTE’S SPRING 2019 EXHIBITION AND MET GALA

(New York, October 9, 2018)—The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced today that The Costume Institute’s Spring 2019 exhibition will be Camp: Notes on Fashion, on view from May 9 through September 8, 2019 (preceded on May 6 by The Costume Institute Benefit). Presented in The Met Fifth Avenue’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, it will explore the origins of the camp aesthetic and how it has evolved from a place of marginality to become an important influence on mainstream culture. Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay Notes on ‘Camp’ provides the framework for the exhibition, which will examine how fashion designers have used their métier as a vehicle to engage with camp in a myriad of compelling, humorous, and sometimes incongruous ways.

“Camp’s disruptive nature and subversion of modern aesthetic values has often been trivialized, but this exhibition will reveal its profound influence on both high art and popular culture,” said Max Hollein, Director of The Met. “By tracing its evolution and highlighting its defining elements, the show will embody the ironic sensibilities of this audacious style, challenge conventional understandings of beauty and taste, and establish the critical role this important genre has played in the history of art and fashion.”

In celebration of the opening, The Costume Institute Benefit, also known as The Met Gala, will take place on Monday, May 6, 2019. The evening’s co-chairs will be Lady Gaga, Alessandro Michele, Harry Styles, Serena Williams, and Anna Wintour. The event is The Costume Institute’s main source of annual funding for exhibitions, publications, acquisitions, and capital improvements.

“Fashion is the most overt and enduring conduit of the camp aesthetic,” said Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute. “Effectively illustrating Sontag’s Notes on ‘Camp,’ the exhibition will advance creative and critical dialogue about the ongoing and ever-evolving impact of camp on fashion.”

The exhibition will feature approximately 175 objects, including womenswear and menswear, as well as sculptures, paintings, and drawings dating from the 17th century to the present. The show’s opening section will position Versailles as a “camp Eden” and address the concept of se camper—”to posture boldly”—in the royal courts of Louis XIV and Louis XV. It will then focus on the figure of the dandy as a “camp ideal” and trace camp’s origins to the queer subcultures of Europe and America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In her essay, Sontag defined camp as an aesthetic and outlined its primary characteristics. The largest section of the exhibition will be devoted to how these elements-which include irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration-are expressed in fashion.

Designers whose works will be featured in the exhibition include Gilbert Adrian, Cristóbal Balenciaga, Thom Browne, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, John Galliano (for Martin Margiela, House of Dior, and his own label), Jean Paul Gaultier, Rudi Gernreich, Guccio Gucci, Demna Gvasalia (for Balenciaga and his own label), Marc Jacobs (for Louis Vuitton and his own label), Charles James, Stephen Jones, Christian Lacroix, Karl Lagerfeld (for House of Chanel, Chloe, and his own label), Herbert and Beth Levine, Alessandro Michele (for Gucci), Franco Moschino, Thierry Mugler, Norman Norell, Marjan Pejoski, Paul Poiret, Miuccia Prada, Richard Quinn, Christian Francis Roth, Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli, Jeremy Scott (for Moschino and his own label), Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren (for Viktor & Rolf), Anna Sui, Philip Treacy, Walter Van Beirendonck, Donatella Versace (for Versace), Gianni Versace, Vivienne Westwood, and Charles Frederick Worth.

The exhibition is organized by Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, with Karen Van Godtsenhoven, Associate Curator. Theater scenographer Jan Versweyveld, whose work includes Lazarus with David Bowie as well as Broadway productions of A View from the Bridge and The Crucible, will create the exhibition design with The Met’s Design Department. Select mannequin headpieces will be created by Shay Ashual. Raul Avila will produce the gala décor, which he has done since 2007.

A publication by Andrew Bolton with Fabio Cleto, Karen van Godtsenhoven, and Amanda Garfinkel will accompany the exhibition and include new photography by Johnny Dufort. It will be published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and distributed by Yale University Press.

The exhibition is made possible by Gucci.

Additional support is provided by Condé Nast.

RICHARD BERNSTEIN: STARMAKER

Kicking off New York Fashion Week, the Richard Bernstein: STARMAKER book launch party was celebrated at PUBLIC ARTS at Public in New York City earlier this month.

The venue walls were plastered with enlarged artwork of and cut outs of Interview Magazine covers spanning from 1972 to 1989. Legendary cover stars came to life on stage in a Studio 54 VIP Room setting while being catered to by a bevy of hunky bus boys. Performers who resembled Divine, Liza Minelli, Halston, Pat Ast, Jerry Hall and Grace Jones danced and partied the night away.

Celebrities in attendance were the creative director of the new Interview Magazine Mel Ottenberg, Pat Cleveland, Halstonette Karen Bjornson, famed Studio 54 publicist Carmen D’Alessio, Gaultier muse Stella Ellis, Angie Everhart, Amanda Lepore, Miss Jay Alexander, Dianne Brill, artist David Croland, Michael Musto, head of Warhol Enterprises Vincent Fremont and Jeffrey Deitch.

The private event was hosted by authors Mauricio and Roger Padilha whose book Richard Bernstein: STARMAKER Andy Warhol’s Cover Artist is now available in all major bookstores worldwide and is published by Rizzoli International Publications Inc. and presented by Alcone Company with FHI-Heat, Oralgen, Svedka and PUBLIC ARTS at Public.

Performers as Liza Minelli and Halston

Performers as Divine, Pat Ast, and Grace Jones

Stella Rose St. Claire

Mel Ottenberg, Stylist and Creative Director of Interview Magazine

John, Ellen, and Rory Trifon, family of Richard Bernstein

Jeffrey Deitch, art dealer and curator, and Mauricio Padilha, co-founder of  MAO Public Relations

Amanda Lepore.

Journalist Michael Musto

Angie Everheart, model and actress

Jonte Moaning, performer, dressed as Grace Jones

Dianne Brill, Queen of New York nightlife

Stylist Wouri Vice

(left) Chris Makos, famed photographer, (center) Shelly Fremont, film director and producer, (right) Vincent Fremont, film producer and head of Warhol Enterprises

Legendary models Karen Bjornson (left) and Pat Cleveland (right)

Olivier Lapidus Departs from Lanvin

Olivier Lapidus, photo by Pascal Le Segretain

Lanvin parted ways with its artistic director Olivier Lapidus yesterday, the French fashion house reported. Mr. Lapidus, who joined the brand in the summer of 2017, had only overseen two shows at the struggling brand. His sudden departure is one that some are calling a pattern.

Joanne Cheng, interim CEO of Lanvin told WWD, “Olivier steered the Maison through a transitional period between ownerships,” and “We thank him for that, and wish him every success for his own brand and future endeavors.” The in-house design team will be responsible for further collections until a new artistic director is found.

Last month the Maison was acquired by Fosun International, a Chinese conglomerate after a bidding war ensued to purchase and revive the brand, which has been struggling with declining sales and an identity crisis for the past several years. After the sudden firing of acclaimed designer Alber Elbaz in 2015, the company hired Bouchra Jarrar, who lasted for 16 months. Quickly afterward, Lanvin brought in Mr. Lapidus.

Alber Elbaz, photo by Inez Van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin

It seems clear that the house has been struggling to identify their customer, further reflected by the stark contrasts between the last three artistic directors. The shoes left behind by Alber Elbaz, creative director for 14 years, are indeed proving difficult to fill. Mr. Elbaz joined Lanvin in 2001 and remained the creative director until 2015. During his tenure, he is credited with finding the optimal balance between heritage and commercial success at one of the oldest couture houses in France. In addition to his unique interpretation of fashion, he was beloved for his warm heart and genial personality.

Perhaps due to the acquisition by Fosun and a desire to start with a clean slate, or maybe as a result of the harsh words of fashion critics towards Lapidus’ work, the house will need to attract new talent. We will certainly be looking forward with eager anticipation to the new chapter of this iconic house.

WHAT TISCI MEANS FOR BURBERRY


Text by Rishabh Manocha

Riccardo Tisci is no novice in the landscape of fashion. His conceptual prowess, studded with an eccentric interplay of leather, hardware, embellishment, and lace raised many eyebrows during his time as Givenchy’s creative director. Tisci hails from London’s Central St. Martins where he spent his young days mastering the art of subversive, unapologetically sexual, coarsely dramatic imagery. He will now return to the British capital to take the helm as Chief Creative Officer at Burberry.

The appointment wasn’t anticipated, but it is well known that Marco Gobetti, newly- appointed company CEO isn’t predictable either. Chief amongst Gobetti’s credits is the utter transformation of Celine and Givenchy to the forefront of Paris catwalks in recent years. Gobetti, a close friend and mentor of Tisci’s, laid out plans later last year to completely overhaul the brand character of Burberry.

The brand, which is known for its strong links to British heritage and traditions, will now inevitably face one of the most momentous transformations of our time. From being at the pinnacle of embracing technology in fashion to defining British fashion identity, Burberry has always executed timely strategy. However, as sales began to decline and the call for houses to revisit their marketing and production strategies becomes more resounding, this appointment indeed seems apt. Gobetti, in a statement last year, mentioned how Burberry had lost its distinct voice by catering to a middle-market audience. An increased supply and reduced demand indeed presented a major setback for company sales and share prices. However, he added that Burberry would now return to the rungs of true luxury catering mostly to the high-end consumer, with a renewed focus on accessories. This transition he anticipated would be rewarding.

It also means that two Italian pioneers in their respective rights will run the most significant house in British fashion. Their collaborative approach has proven to be both commercially profitable and artistically refreshing in the past. Tisci’s penchant for streetwear is bold, audacious, and revitalizing. His transformation of the sweatshirt as an object of high fashion is perhaps most reflective of his influence on contemporary culture. The collaboration with Nike to stylize the sneaker, Rihanna’s look on her Diamonds World Tour in 2013, and the dramatic designs worn by countless stars at red carpet events around the world  manifest his ability to, time and again, give us a more compelling version of his philosophy. It remains uncertain how much the superficial image of Burberry will change. However, the clash, perhaps a harmonious clash of the two schools (Burberry and Tisci) remains one of the most highly anticipated phenomena to soon unravel.

 


Givenchy Jeans Campaign


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Spring/Summer 2013 Givenchy Campaign
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Riccardo Tisci with Beyoncé, wearing Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci

Photographed by Anton Corbijn, Vogue, September 2015


March 18, 2013 – Toronto, Ontario, Canada – RIHANNA performed a sold out show at the Air Canada Centre during her ‘Diamonds World Tour.


Kim Kardashian takes a selfie with Riccardo in custom Givenchy during a fitting for her wedding at Versailles
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OISIN HUNT AUTUMN/WINTER ’18 LOOKBOOK

Oisín Hunt is an Irish fashion designer based in New York. During his education at the National University of Ireland he received a BSc in Business and Management, Oisin also worked under a prestigious tailer in Dublin City for 3 years. During that time, in 2013 Oisín started his first brand Dog Eat Dog (D.EA.D) which he used as an alias name to work and sell under.

Photography by Veselina Tsankova, Model Keenan Javon represented by State Management NY, Styled by Roberta Basilio, Grooming by Luzmyrna Crespo

 

T-shirt Helmut Lang, Pants Rag & Bone, Coat Oisín Hunt, Boots Calvin Klein , Jewelry stylist’s own

 

 

T-shirt  Drifter, shirt Public School, Pants Oisín Hunt, Sunglasses vintage, Boots and socks Calvin Klein

 

 

 

 

Sweater ACNE studios, Pants Helmut Lang, Coat – Oisín Hunt, Sunglasses vintage, Boots Calvin Klein

 

 

 

 

Shirt 3.1 Phillip Lim, Coat Oisín Hunt, Hat Urban Outfitters, Belt John Varvatos, Boots Calvin Klein

 

 

 

 

Hoody Oisín Hunt

 

 

Shirt Helmut Lang, Pants Oisín Hunt, Sunglasses vintage, Boots Calvin Klein, Jewelry stylist’s own

 

Shirt Rag & Bone, Coat and Pants Oisín Hunt, Hat Urban Outfitters, Belt John Varvatos, Boots Calvin Klein

 

THE WEBSTER OPENS ITS NEWEST LOCATION IN NYC

With the store originating from the tropics of South Beach and having expanded to Houston, Costa Mesa, and Bal Harbour—it was only natural for The Webster to house their new location in the heart of New York City’s, Soho. Laure Heriard Dubreuil, founder of the luxury retailer, has mirrored the same opulent brand formula with a new ingredient—Webster Home. The six story building will handle pieces by Italian artist Gaetano Pesce, Pierre Frey fabrics that are exclusive to The Webster, and Nada Debs brass candy colored pebble table. Throughout the renovation of their new location The Webster befriended Maxi Cohen, photographer, video artist, and neighbor whose piece is now featured on the third floor.

The store is thoughtfully filled with French 50’s sconce lights and wall papers from the 20’s and 30’s and does the historical 1878, 12,000-square-foot building proud. Turn of the century light wells guide you onto a vintage loading dock entrance, and step out into a room that’s a fusion of new and retrograded pieces mirroring the original Webster store, which was redeveloped with the help and design of Christopher Osvai.

Filling the six floored location are thirty male designers and 68 women designers, including but not limited to Isa Arfen, Julien David, and jewelry by Anita Ko, The Webster combines high end clothing interwoven amongst art deco and one of a kind installations. Sculptures such as Aaron Young’s “Below the Underdog, 2010” is set amongst thoughtfully chosen menswear on the fourth floor.

For more information about the founder, Laure Heriard Dubreuil, check out her Iris Woman feature!

All photos by Andrew Rowat courtesy of Karla Otto Public Relations

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster flagship retail store located at 29 Greene Street in New York, NY opening in Nov 2017.

 

The Webster, located at 29 Greene Street, opened to the public Monday, November 6, 2017

Shop online here

HERE’S HOW TO HELP HOUSTON

The roots of IRIS Covet Book are planted in Houston, and it breaks our hearts to see the impact that this storm has had on the citizens of Texas. With more rainfall and subsequent damage, health risks, and loss of life and property to come, it will be an upward battle for the resilient Lone Star state. Luckily, many celebrities, philanthropists, activists, politicians, etc. have reached out and donated to relief funds all over the country. Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook has promised to match donations for relief through the Center of Disaster Philanthropy for up to a million dollars, Kim Kardashian and her family have pledged $500,000, and many other notable figures have gone even beyond that in order to help those in need.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BYYergyAYU5/?taken-by=jlo

Jennifer Lopez and partner, Alex Rodriguez, donate $25,000 (x2) as part of the celebrity social media challenge to raise money for relief

In a statement to the Houston Chronicle, Beyoncé said, “My heart goes out to my hometown, Houston, and I remain in constant prayer for those affected and for the rescuers who have been so brave and determined to do so much to help. I am working closely with my team at BeyGOOD as well as my pastor [Rudy Rasmus at St. John’s in downtown Houston] to implement a plan to help as many as we can.”

A post shared by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

In these uncertain times of what seems like constant breaking news and socio-political strife, it is heart-warming to know that even when things seem to be the darkest, we can count on each other to shed light and give aid. In the meantime, during these recovery efforts, we can continue to donate, volunteer, and pray for a speedy recovery to those affected. 

 

– Irma Brindis, Publisher

To donate to the organizations, see the links below.

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund – Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner has established the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund that will accept tax deductible flood relief donations for victims that have been affected by the recent floods.

Southern Baptist Disaster Relief – Meets the urgent needs of communities in crisis, from serving food to volunteers in rebuilding communities.

Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County – Provides shelter and resources for the homeless of Houston and surrounding areas.

Texas Diaper Bank – Provides diapers to those in need. In everyday life, and especially in times of crisis, diapers are an essential that is incredibly hard to afford.

SPCA Of Texas – Works to rescue and relocate animals caught in Hurricane Harvey.

Portlight – a disaster response organization specifically serving individuals with disabilities.

The Galveston Food Bank

Food Bank Of Corpus Christi

Houston Food Bank

Driscoll Children’s Hospital – This hospital will be taking in evacuated NICU babies.

American Red Cross

 

SUPREME X LOUIS VUITTON

Supreme has emerged as a player in the world of high fashion. The evolution from a skateboarding supply store in 1994 to an internationally recognized streetwear powerhouse, Supreme has constantly impressed and acted as a pioneer in the fashion industry. The cult-like following often elects to pay double or triple the retail price of the clothes in order to attain the highly coveted pieces via resale sites, such as eBay or Grailed. With its most recent collaboration, Supreme has elected to once again push its limits and enter the world of high fashion. The new collaboration with Parisian fashion titan Louis Vuitton features bags, jackets, scarves, tees, and accessories.

THEM PANTS AINT EVEN COMING OUT THO

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A$AP Rocky models the unreleased Supreme X Louis Vuitton monogram logo pants.

Louis Vuitton and Supreme have shared history dating back to 2000, when Louis Vuitton sued the NY streetwear brand for mimicking its iconic monogram design on their skateboard decks. Despite their tumultuous introduction, the collaboration has managed to meld two seemingly polarized audiences into a cult following. Similarly, brands such as Vetements have sold collaborations with Champion, as well as many other seemingly incongruous brands, by taking the norm and making it into a luxury artifact. In this recent collaboration, pieces such as the Red Louis Vuitton trunks outfitted with the famous Supreme box logo, the monogrammed denim jackets, and the infamous Supreme/Louis Vuitton box logo tee have come under fire for their high prices, but said high prices don’t seem to deter the fans. In fact, the luxury price point and limited quantity inspire even more frenzied competition.  

@louisvuitton ON GO

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Travis Scott wearing the coveted Supreme X Louis Vuitton box logo tee and sunglasses.

The pop-up shops, located in Seoul, Tokyo, Beijing, Paris, London, Miami, Houston, and Los Angeles, generated colossal lines within hours of their announcement. These pop-up shops are the first opportunity that the public has to purchase items from this collection, and fans are determined to be a part of the historic collaboration. However, Louis Vuitton has stated that the release will be extremely limited, indicating that the fervor is not for naught. The mania has caused streets to shut down, and police intervention has been necessary in order to keep streets and sidewalks clear. Supreme has proven that it is able to thrive in the ever-changing world of fashion, and cement itself as a heavyweight contender in the luxury and streetwear worlds today.

Supreme®/Louis Vuitton® Fall 2017. For more info go to louisvuitton.com #LVxSupreme

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Supreme shows off their spin on their classic bomber jacket

CONFIRMED POP-UP STORE LOCATIONS/DATES

LA

833 E 3rd St

PARIS

4 Rue du Pont Neuf.

BEIJING

北京 798

LONDON

180 The Strand

SYDNEY

95 Roscoe Street

Bondi Beach, NSW 2026

TOKYO

C-1, 5-3-18

Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku

June 30 – July 13, 2017

Monday to Sunday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. local time

Thursday 10 a.m.-7 p.m.

 

Article by Sol Thompson | Featured Photo Courtesy of © Supreme NYC via supremenyc.com